Conferees Embrace New Authority for OffBase Infrastructure Projects

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A new authority allowing DOD to provide funding to state and local governments for off-base infrastructure projects has been included in the final version of the fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill. House and Senate negotiators had to make several tweaks, though, as they reconciled competing versions of the new authority for the department to award grants to address deficiencies in community infrastructure if the assistance will enhance the military value, resilience or military family quality of life at an installation.The final language sunsets the Defense Community Infrastructure Pilot Program after 10 years, a compromise between the five-year limit the Senate would have placed on it and the House’s intention to create a permanent program. The final provision adopts the Senate requirement for state and local participants to contribute at least 30 percent of the total project cost; the House had proposed a 20 percent cost share for participants. The cost-share requirement can be waived, however, for rural communities or “for reasons related to national security,” under the compromise language.A transportation project, a school, hospital, police, fire, emergency response or other community support facility, or a waste, wastewater, telecommunications, electric, gas or other utility infrastructure project would be eligible for the program, according to section 2861.In the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report, lawmakers underscored the value of the new authority: “The conferees note the importance of the communities that surround and support U.S. military installations and believe that this program can be of tremendous benefit to both the surrounding community and respective installations.” Lawmakers reached agreement on the conference report Monday. The House is expected to vote on the legislation this week, and the Senate possibly in August.Photo by Aaron Rosenblattlast_img read more

Get an unlocked iPhone X for 750

first_imgRemember when the iPhone X debuted in late 2017? “A $1,000 phone?! It’ll be a cold day in…” Ah, so you do remember.Today only, and while supplies last, Best Buy has the unlocked Apple iPhone X (64GB) for $749.99 shipped when you choose the “activate later” option. That’s $250 off and one of the best iPhone X deals I can recall seeing.See it at Best BuyAs you’ve probably noticed on the product page, you also have the option of getting the phone for $699.99 — but that’s if you activate it with AT&T, Sprint or Verizon. My advice: Buy it outright, then take it to a carrier with cheaper rates. You’ll save in the long run, and you’ll have the option of switching carriers anytime you want.The elephant in this particular room is the iPhone XR, which also runs $750 for the unlocked 64GB model. Personally, I think they’re both great phones, but there are a few key differences. Post a comment $949 The iPhone X has a 5.8-inch OLED screen and the XR has a 6.1-inch LCD. They’re both gorgeous. I’d say size is the only factor that’s changed. The iPhone X has dual rear cameras, which allows for real 2x optical zoom and some sweet bokeh (portrait effect) photography. The XR’s single rear camera, meanwhile, is limited to digital zoom, though its software-based bokeh mode is surprisingly good.The XR also has slightly better battery life and support for dual-SIM technology. Beyond all that, the two are pretty darn similar. Read CNET’s iPhone X review (“Still a contender”) and iPhone XR review (“The best iPhone value in years”) to learn more. Amazon AT&T Best Buy Sprint Verizon Apple See It 6:16 Mentioned Above Apple iPhone X (64GB, Space Gray) Share your voice $611 iPhone X and Galaxy Note 8: Similar cameras, different results $899 Amazon Now playing: Watch this: 50 Photos Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Apple iPhone X $899 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. See All CNET may get a commission from retail offers.center_img The iPhone X makes a comeback, catch it while you can See It Review • iPhone X review: This iPhone XS predecessor is still a contender • See it Best Buy The Cheapskate Apple 0 Preview • iPhone X: We’ve already got one. Here’s what it’s like. I’ll just leave it at this: If you’ve been wanting an iPhone X, here’s your very rare chance to save big — without having to sign up for an extended lease and/or service agreement.Your thoughts?Bonus deal: Score a sweet deal on a Sam’s Club membershipDo you have a Sam’s Club warehouse store near you? For a limited time, and while supplies last, Groupon is offering a one-year Sam’s Club membership and $10 e-gift card for $35. Regular price for the membership alone: $45.See it at GrouponPro tip: Cash-back service Ebates is currently offering 6 percent back on Groupon purchases, so that would bring your net total to just below $33.Note that although the e-gift card is delivered electronically, it can be used for both in-store and online purchases. The membership package also includes a separate $15 e-gift card for use exclusively online and $10 off your first produce purchase of at least $10. All told, then, this $35 purchase is worth $80.Bonus deal No. 2: Get Hooked on Phonics (literally and figuratively) for freeHappy Read Across America Day! Do you have little ones who are still learning their words? Today only, Hooked on Phonics is offering a free one-year Learn to Read digital subscription. Regular price: $40. Or get a lifetime subscription for just $10! (Regular price: $50.)See it at Hooked on PhonicsDesigned for ages three to seven, the Hooked on Phonics app (which is available for Android, iOS, Amazon tablets and web browsers) provides a mix of instructional videos, practice games and illustrated stories.If you choose the free year, your subscription will not automatically renew — but I’d put a reminder in your calendar just in case.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! reading • Get an unlocked iPhone X for $750 Tags Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Boost Mobile See It Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Phones Mobile Apps Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumorslast_img read more

A ransomware attack causes printing and delivery disruptions for several major US

first_imgA cyber-attack into one of United States’ biggest media groups, the Tribune Publishing, caused major printing and delivery disruptions for several major US newspapers over the weekend. This cyber attack affected the printing centers operated by the publishing firm and also its former property, the Los Angeles Times. The attack that took place on Saturday seemed to have originated from outside the United States, according to the Los Angeles Times report. This led to the distribution delays in the Saturday edition of the Times, the Tribune, the Sun and other newspapers that share a production platform in Los Angeles. According to The New York Times, “a news article in The Los Angeles Times, and one outside computer expert said the attack shared characteristics with a form of ransomware called Ryuk, which was used to target a North Carolina water utility in October and other critical infrastructure.” According to The Los Angeles Times report, “The Times and the San Diego paper became aware of the problem near midnight on Thursday. Programmers worked to isolate the bug, which Tribune Publishing identified as a malware attack, but at every turn, the programmers ran into additional issues trying to access a myriad of files, including advertisements that needed to be added to the pages or paid obituaries.” “After identifying the server outage as a virus, technology teams made progress on Friday quarantining it and bringing back servers, but some of their security patches didn’t hold and the virus began to reinfect the network, impacting a series of servers used for news production and manufacturing processes”, the report added. By late Friday, the attack was hindering the transmission of pages from offices across Southern California to printing presses as publication deadlines approached. Tribune Publishing said in a statement on Saturday, “the personal data of our subscribers, online users, and advertising clients have not been compromised. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank our readers and advertising partners for their patience as we investigate the situation.” It was unclear whether company officials have been in contact with law enforcement regarding the suspected attack. Katie Waldman, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, said “we are aware of reports of a potential cyber incident affecting several news outlets, and are working with our government and industry partners to better understand the situation”, the Los Angeles Times reported. Pam Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum, a nonprofit public interest research group, said, “usually when someone tries to disrupt a significant digital resource like a newspaper, you’re looking at an experienced and sophisticated hacker”. She added that the holidays are “a well known time for mischief” by digital troublemakers because organizations are more thinly staffed. Read more about this news on The Los Angeles Times’ complete report. Read Next Hackers are our society’s immune system – Keren Elazari on the future of Cybersecurity Anatomy of a Crypto Ransomware Sennheiser opens up about its major blunder that let hackers easily carry out man-in-the-middle attackslast_img read more