Cyndi Stivers Joins AOL As Homepage EditorInChief

first_imgAOL has hired Cyndi Stivers as its new homepage editor-in-chief. Her appointment signals the company’s efforts to remake AOL.com as a destination site that more effectively curates content from its network of brands.Starting in June, Stivers will head up the editorial programming on AOL’s homepage, its associated apps and syndicated feeds, says Chris Grosso, AOL’s senior vice president and general manager of AOL homepages.Stivers, who will report to Grosso, is currently editor-in-chief of Columbia Journalism Review, a post she took in late 2011 after leaving Time Inc. earlier in the year following the Jack Griffin shake-up. “As we evolve AOL.com as a content destination, we will look to Cyndi to ensure the site showcases the most compelling stories relevant to our viewers and drive a distinctive editorial voice,” says Grosso. “We’ll also be relying on her creativity to help us ignite our live programming and add more opportunities for visitors to engage with each other around our content.”Stivers was a founding editor of Time Out New York and later joined Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia to help launch the company’s Sirius satellite ratio channel, where she worked with then president and CEO Susan Lyne, currently AOL’s brand group CEO.last_img read more

TMobile delays full 600MHz 5G launch until second half of 2019

first_imgT-Mobile Chief Technology Officer Neville Ray says 5G will be a second-half story for the company. Roger Cheng/CNET Eager to jump on T-Mobile’s 5G network? You’re going to have wait a little longer. T-Mobile Chief Technology Officer Neville Ray said in an interview at MWC on Monday that the company won’t be formally launching its 5G service in its first 30 cities until the second half of 2019. The reason: the lack of phones that can tap into the critical low-band 600MHz spectrum that will power much of its early 5G coverage.”We were hopeful, a year ago, that by this time, we would have a device,” he said here in Barcelona. “It’s not there yet.”Ray had pushed the industry to move faster with compatible devices, but noted much of the industry was working on devices that supported bands with higher frequencies, which offer better speeds, but less range. The first 5G smartphone, Samsung’s Galaxy S10 5G, will tap into higher-frequency bands and come out with Verizon Wireless first. AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile all have networks that are compatible with the Galaxy S10 5G, and T-Mobile said it will carry the phone in the first half. But the coverage using super-high frequency millimeter-wave spectrum is so minimal that Ray said the company isn’t sure how — or if — it will promote it. More from MWC 2019 Now playing: Watch this: Jun 29 • Galaxy S10 5G, OnePlus 7 Pro LG V50 ThinQ 5G: Why you shouldn’t rush to buy a 5G phone 28 Photos “You can’t go to a US consumer and charge them a big premium and it works on three street corners,” Ray said. Ray applauded Sprint for at least staking a claim and saying it would cover more than 1,000 square miles by the first half. He’s waiting to hear about AT&T and Verizon’s coverage plans. AT&T touted its existing service and what’s still upcoming. “We offer the only live mobile 5G network and device today, and are continuing to expand coverage and device options,” said an AT&T spokesman. “I’m surprised they continue to ignore our announced plans to offer a mobile 5G network on low-band spectrum this year with nationwide coverage in early 2020.”Verizon wasn’t available for comment. Ray said the company would go big with 5G in the second half once it gets a device that can tap into its 600MHz spectrum. He declined to comment on which company would supply the phone. Originally published at 6:12 a.m. PT.Update, 8:05 a.m. PT: Adds background and comment from AT&T.Update, 9:05 a.m. PT: Adds more background. Update, 10:15 a.m. PT: Adds additional quote from Neville Ray. Comments Tags 11 reading • T-Mobile delays full 600MHz 5G launch until second half of 2019 Phones Mobile World Congress 2019 Jul 9 • Killer cameras and battery life might meet their match in the Note 10 5G AT&T Sprint T-Mobile Verizon Jun 1 • The Nubia Alpha looks like either a house arrest bracelet or Batman’s phone MWC 2019: All the phones and gadgets we cared about • Share your voice See All Ray’s concession throws a wrinkle into the 5G race, as carriers push to the be first to the next-generation wireless technology, which promises a much faster and more responsive network. AT&T has already launched 5G in a dozen markets, but in limited areas, while Verizon has a home 5G network. Sprint, meanwhile, said it plans to launch 5G in four markets in May. The delay also underscores the complexity of building a 5G network and the bets companies must make on what kind of spectrum they can use. Verizon and AT&T initially championed millimeter wave spectrum because it can deliver super-high speeds, but with limited range. T-Mobile opted for lower-band spectrum that has slower peak speaks, but better coverage. Much of the early investment went into devices that use millimeter wave spectrum, which doesn’t play to T-Mobile’s strengths. As such, you expect a loud launch later in the year, even if the Galaxy S10 5G can pick up small bits of 5G here and there. He said he didn’t worry about AT&T and Verizon pulling ahead in the 5G race because of the limited range of millimeter wave. Galaxy Fold vs. Huawei Mate X: Battle of the foldable phones Galaxy S10 Plus ongoing review Microsoft’s HoloLens 2 feels like practical magic Mobile World Congress 2019 Galaxy S10 5G: Samsung debuts its first 5G phone May 13 • Galaxy S10E vs. iPhone XR: Every spec compared 1:52 Mobile World Congress 2019last_img read more