The Loophole and the Ozone Hole

first_imgWho’s to blame?From what I hear, it was a manufacturer of low-end equipment that first walked through the loophole and starting making dry-ship R-22 units. When the EPA didn’t step in to close the loophole, the race was on. Both the EPA and the HVAC industry share the blame.The makers of higher-end equipment don’t want to give up market share to those on the lower end who can exploit a bigger price difference. The dealers and the contractors, likewise, have to compete, and the EPA has forced their hand by allowing this situation to continue.Both sides are to blame, but one is more to blame than the other. Yes, the HVAC industry is exploiting the loophole, but the EPA has the power to close it and has not. The EPA could have shut this down as soon as it became apparent.Carrier has even petitioned the EPA to close the loophole. John Mandyke of Carrier, in an interview with ContractingBusiness.com, explained it this way: “As an industry, we were prepared for the R-22 transition — manufacturers had invested in the new technology and contractors had invested in technician training, as well as in helping consumers prepare for this transition. The loophole threw all that up in the air.”As long as the manufacturers keep making the dry-ship R-22 units, though, the downstream companies — dealers and contractors — feel the pressure to play the game, too. Not all of them, however. I know of one contracting company that, out of the more than 2,000 condensers they’ve installed since this came up, only about 10 have been dry-ship R-22 units. Why you should ask for R-410AIf you’re a builder or contractor installing new HVAC systems or a homeowner in the market for a new air conditioner or heat pump, you really should make sure that you don’t get a new system that has what should be an illegal refrigerant. Here’s why dry-ship R-22 units are a problem:R-22 destroys more ozone than R-410A.R-22 will get more and more expensive as we approach the end of its production in 2020.Once production of R-22 ends, homeowners may end up having to by a new air conditioner sooner than if they’d bought the R-410A system.The presence of so many dry-ship R-22 units has stalled the full-scale adoption of R-410A systems.Even if you don’t believe or care about the ozone hole and skin cancer, this loophole is going to cost people more money when they’re being promised savings. Consider this: A contractor installs a dry-ship R-22 air conditioner for a customer this year. In 2020, manufacturers will stop making R-22. In 2021, it may be more cost-effective to replace the customer’s air conditioner than fix it because of the exorbitant cost of R-22. The customer gets 9 years of use from an air conditioner that should last 15.This whole dry-ship R-22 unit game has been a dirty little secret of the EPA and the HVAC industry with plenty of folks in the industry and government willing to justify jumping through the loophole. Yes, there are some folks with admirable ethics and good motivations, but those of us who are buyers need to be aware of this issue. A contractor may make a compelling case to you about why the loophole is a good thing. Don’t follow them through that hole; the footing isn’t all that steady on the other side. Holes are generally bad things. Those of us who teach building science spend a lot of time showing people how to measure the effects of holes, how to seal them up, and why they’re bad in the first place. That’s not universally true, of course. Some holes we do want, but we also want to be able to control what happens in those holes, as with a door or window.The story I’m about to relay to you involves two holes. One of them was discovered decades ago. The other just appeared in the past two years. These two holes are connected. The fate of the older hole, which we’d like to see get smaller, is now bound up to a degree with the presence of the newer hole, which the EPA could close up completely but hasn’t.This is a dirty little secret of the EPA and the HVAC industry. It involves the environment, the costs that homeowners pay to buy and maintain air conditioners and heat pumps, and a legal loophole that’s starting to look as big as the ozone hole. It’s the story of what’s come to be called the “dry-ship R-22 unit.” If you’re hearing about this for the first time, you’re not alone. I just found out about it myself. Yeah, but how many are really doing it?As it turns out, a surprisingly high percentage of new systems are in the “dry-ship R-22” category. Recently I was speaking with an HVAC supply house executive who told me that these loophole escapees make up about 30% of the units they sell. The author of an article on dry ship R-22 units on the Contracting Business website interviewed his local suppliers and found the following: “One supplier told me it was about even. Several more said they sell slightly more dry units than R-410a systems. One supplier told me they sell four to five times as many dry units as complete systems.”Yes, some of these might actually be used as they’re intended — as replacement components in existing systems — but I think most people in the industry know that the majority of these dry-ship R-22 units are new installs. Can air conditioning make you go blind?My connection to the world of heating and air conditioning contractors goes way back. My grandfather (Allison Sr., whom I called Pappaw) had a heating, AC, plumbing, and electrical business (Bailes Electric) in Leesville, Louisiana, and I used to spend my teenage summers going out on calls with him and my uncle. (The photo of the measuring cup below, which sits on my desk, is from an earlier business he had with his brother, Russell.)One of the things we often did on calls was put the gauges on air conditioners to check the refrigerant charge. Often, Pappaw or my uncle would prepare to fix a hole in the system by emptying all of the refrigerant first. Back in the ’70s, there were no refrigerant capture systems or regulations, so we sprayed a lot of refrigerant out of the hole at the end of the hose on the gauges. The refrigerants of choice at the time were the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which usually went by their trade name, Freon.Remember that stuff? I did a science fair project on CFCs and their effect on our atmosphere in 1978. It turns out that the stuff migrated up to the stratosphere, where it has a tremendous appetite for the three-atom form of oxygen, called ozone. That’s bad. Ozone in the stratosphere has a tremendous appetite for ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun. That’s good. UV radiation, you’re probably aware, has a tremendous appetite for skin cells, causing cancer when we get too much of it. That’s bad.The bottom line: CFCs destroy ozone, which leads to more UV radiation, which leads to more cancer.The amount of ozone in the lower stratosphere has decreased about 4% per decade since we discovered this effect in 1974. In addition, a huge ‘hole’ in the ozone layer develops in the polar regions every spring, and scientists have documented the changes in the ozone hole since discovering it in the 1980s. The ozone levels in the hole are running about half what they were 1980. (See graph below.)You also may have heard reports of sheep going blind in Chile because of the extra UV. It turned out to be a local infection rather than the additional UV radiation coming in through the ozone hole. Still, CFCs destroy ozone, which leads to more cancer and other problems. The science is pretty solid here.In 1987, the Montreal Protocol began the phase-out of CFCs with a plan to move to less harmful refrigerants. In the early ’90s, CFCs were phased out and replaced with the HCFC R-22 in air conditioning systems. Its use was to be temporary, as the 1993 decision to move to more ozone-friendly refrigerants would end the use of new R-22 HVACR systems (the R is for refrigeration) at the end of 2009. The more benign HFC R-410A became the replacement, and it was set to become the only game in town for new systems manufactured starting in 2010. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a RESNET-accredited energy consultant, trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. A loophole the size of the ozone holeThe US EPA gave manufacturers and contractors some wiggle room, naturally. They couldn’t just tell the manufacturers they had to destroy all their unsold units in 2010. They also couldn’t just strand all the people out there who already had R-22 in their air conditioners. As a result, manufacturers could sell their stock of R-22 units until depleted, continue to make parts to maintain the existing systems, and keep making R-22 refrigerant until 2020.If you go to the EPA’s website to read about the phase-out of R-22, you’ll find this statement: “[H]eating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system manufacturers may not produce new air conditioners and heat pumps containing R-22.”Do you see the loophole? As long as they ship the units “dry,” manufacturers concluded, they could continue to make and sell air conditioners and heat pumps designed to use R-22. Hence the term “dry-ship R-22 unit.” Rather than charging them with R-22 at the factory, they fill them with nitrogen and let the contractors add the R-22.Clearly, this violates the intent of the regulation phasing out R-22 when these dry-ship R-22 units are used as new installs. There’s your loophole the size of the ozone hole.last_img read more

Touch Football Australia Website Refresh and Reboot

first_imgTouch Football Australia today announced the launch of its newly revamped and re-designed website to the membership and wider public. The streamlined site developed in conjunction with technology partners, Sports Technology Group (STG) offers users quick and easy access to essential information on the sport and a number of enhanced and new features. The new website goes live today, Wednesday 5 July 2017 and is located at the same URL address, transitioning from the previous site: https://www.touchfootball.com.au.According to Acting CEO’s Tim Arnold and Garry Foran, the new and improved site provides a welcome change and improvement to the online platform and a new level of service and content delivery to members and the broader touch football community.“It features easier navigation on where to play touch football and find key TFA resources, junior and schools information, publications and services,” Arnold said. “It also features a streamlined video and image gallery, refreshed domestic and international news and events carousel and relevant sport and commercial partner information.“The new website has a clean, uncluttered design, improved functionality and richer, refreshed content; all focused and aligned to TFA’s strategic targets of one million participants and exposures by 2020 and ensuring quality experiences for participants,” Arnold added.“The cleaner lines and look, social images and navigation of the site provides for our members and extended audiences the latest information and content. But as a far better reflection and representation of the sport and in a more structured, user-friendly and mobile ready format.”Foran praised the work of the staff who have led the project, stating “it’s been a whole of TFA team effort – we are excited about the evolution of the site to what it is today, with the various State website upgrades to follow in coming months. This all follows the extensive member and wider user feedback and capturing the latest in online technology and design and contemporary approaches,” he said.TFA’s new website will be updated on a regular basis with news of events, activations, milestones and latest information, all aligned and integrated with TFA communication channels. Come and join the touch football conversation and stay connected with our new social news hub, digital channels and member stories from across the country.The new and improved TFA TV platform is now also bigger and better with the option of switching easily between videos and the photo gallery – submit your own and on the site you go!Log on and visit us now at www.touchfootball.com.au – we hope you enjoy the experience and welcome ongoing feedback. Check out the video as a guide through the new features and sign up to the TFA Newsletter!last_img read more

10 months agoSampdoria coach Giampaolo: Quagliarella just like Ronaldo

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Sampdoria coach Giampaolo: Quagliarella just like Ronaldoby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSampdoria coach Marco Giampaolo is delighted to be counting on Fabio Quagliarella.For Giampaolo, Quagliarella can be compared with Juventus star Cristiano Ronaldo.”You could compare him to Ronaldo,” Giampaolo said. “He has a very high shot percentage, he always scores… and then of course he’s already worn that [Juventus] shirt. “I prefer to call him our Quagliarella though.” last_img

9 months agoArsenal, Man Utd and Tottenham all tracking Guingamp star Marcus Thuram

first_imgArsenal, Man Utd and Tottenham all tracking Guingamp star Marcus Thuramby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe son of France World Cup winner is being watched by Arsenal, Manchester United and Tottenham.They’re all on the trail of striker Marcus Thuram – the son of French World Cup winner Lilian, says The Sun.The Guingamp star has hit 10 goals in 17 games this season to catch the eyes of the Premier League trio.Thuram scored the winner as his club shocked holders Paris Saint-Germain, beating them 2-1 in the French League Cup last week.The 21-year-old has won rave reviews this season, despite Brittany-based minnows Guingamp propping up Ligue 1.And the Gunners, Spurs and United all reportedly sent scouts to check on him against Saint-Etienne on Saturday. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Ohio State athletics selfreports 24 minor NCAA violations

Coach Pete Hanson sent letters to two prospective student-athletes in March 2013 that promised them athletically related financial aid. At the time each athlete received said letter, they had not yet reached their senior years in high school. The Compliance Office determined there to be seven impermissible phone calls to prospective student-athletes and/or their parents after an April 2013 review of phone records between Aug. 1, 2012, and March 1, 2013. The report states they were the result of inadvertent “pocket dials.” A coach inadvertently sent recruiting materials to a 2016 prospective student-athlete. Men’s GymnasticsReported Nov. 5 Two incoming prospective student-athletes — one in men’s soccer and the other in women’s volleyball — participated in voluntary workouts conducted by an OSU strength coach while not being enrolled at OSU. Program engaged in seven hours of out-of-season conditioning activities involving gymnastics equipment. Members of the synchronized swimming team posted photos of prospective student-athletes they were hosting to both Facebook and Instagram on Oct. 21, 2012. The photos that were posted were then commented on by the student-athletes and coach Holly Vargo-Brown. Coach Geoff Carlston made an impermissible telephone call to a prospective student-athlete who was a sophomore in high school on Oct. 8, 2012. On April 24, an assistant coach replied to an email from a prospective student-athlete who was a sophomore in high school. Reported Nov. 4 Women’s LacrosseReported July 23 Two private camps in spring 2013 impermissibly used the names of an OSU coach and two student-athletes to advertise the camps. A women’s hockey volunteer coach was involved with a local sports club that had multiple prospective student-athletes residing outside a permitted 50-mile radius of the university. On May 7, the coach provided a private lesson to a current member of the women’s team, and while also serving as a volunteer coach for the men’s ice hockey team from 2009-11, the coach provided three student-athletes a combined total of four private lessons during summer vacation. Women’s SoccerReported July 25 Synchronized SwimmingReported July 9 Click to expand.The Ohio State athletic department self-reported 24 minor violations in the second half of 2013, including nine for “impermissible” phone calls, text messages and emails to prospective student-athletes, as well as three violations for various involvement in conditioning and summer camp activities.The figures are a result of an open records request submitted Thursday by The Lantern and released Friday by the OSU public records office.None of the violations are considered major, but the report included 19 violations that included “prospective student-athletes.”The last 2013 violation was reported Nov. 6.In each case, the school proposed its own corrective action to either the Big Ten or NCAA, who accepted the proposals but at times, offered further recommendations to each sport. Common resolutions include issuing a letter of education to the respective coaching staff and restraining them from contacting the prospective student-athletes for a period of time, usually two weeks. The football program, however, was only restricted to one week of no contact for impermissible phone calls.OSU athletic director and Vice President Gene Smith said the school typically has “about 40” self-reported secondary violations annually during an interview with The Lantern May 15, 2012.“On an annual basis, we have about 40 (violations),” Smith said. “It ranges in that area we’re sitting at. In that 40 range is where we always hang.“Our whole thing is if we have 10 (violations), I’d have a problem. I mean, I really would because people are going to make mistakes. And that means if I only have 10 out of 350 employees (and) 1,000 athletes – something’s not right.”FootballReported June 27 WrestlingReported July 11 Carlston replied to a text message from a prospective student-athlete in February 2013 who was a junior in high school. Carlston mistakenly thought it was an email, not a text. Reported July 19 On Jan. 10, 2013, the Compliance Office approved and provided what was determined to be an official visit for a prospective student-athlete who had not yet been registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Reported July 29 On Oct. 17, 2012, coach Alexis Venechanos made an impermissible phone call to a prospective student-athlete in the 2015 class. An assistant coach made an impermissible phone call to a 2015 prospective student-athlete March 26. A total of three incoming student-athletes were employed as volunteers at the LiFE Sports Camp June 26. All three were enrolled in summer school, but were still considered prospective student-athletes in terms of employment. On both March 25 and May 7, coach Tom Ryan made two impermissible phone calls to 2014 prospective student-athletes. The field hockey program received approval from the OSU Compliance Office that allowed it to put an image of a current member of the team on an institutional brochure. Women’s VolleyballReported July 15 BaseballReported July 29 A member of the coaching staff was reported to have used a smokeless tobacco product during a game, violating NCAA bylaws. An assistant coach made an impermissible phone call to a 2015 prospective student-athlete April 25. An assistant coach and an assistant director of compliance distributed camp postcards at a soccer tournament May 4. Reported Nov. 6 Field HockeyReported July 24 Men’s SoccerReported July 29 The baseball director of operations participated in an off-campus baseball league against prospective student-athletes. Women’s GolfReported Sept. 12 On June 25, coach Therese Hession accepted a Facebook friend request from a 2016 prospective student-athlete. Two incoming prospective student-athletes — one in women’s volleyball and the other in men’s soccer — participated in voluntary workouts conducted by an OSU strength coach while not enrolled at OSU. Men’s and Women’s Ice HockeyReported Aug. 1 Men’s VolleyballReported July 15 Men’s and Women’s Swimming and DivingReported July 15During a dead period, then-men’s and women’s diving coach Vince Panzano flew to The Woodlands, Texas, April 15 and observed several unknown prospective student-athletes practice. read more

Pep confirms David Silva injury

first_imgPep Guardiola has confirmed David Silva will be on the treatment table for a few weeks after picking up a hamstring injury in Manchester City’s loss to Chelsea.Silva was replaced by Ilkay Gundogan in the 68th minute of the 2-0 defeat at Stamford Bridge after pulling the hamstring in his right leg.The former Valencia man is one of a number of players who will miss the visit of Hoffenheim to the Etihad Stadium on Tuesday in the Champions League.Asked about his injury list, Guardiola told Sky: “David Silva is not able. Kevin De Bruyne (knee) is not able. Danilo is not able. Sergio Aguero is not ready.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“We have 15 players available, so I can’t do it too much (rotating). We are in the next stage which is important but we have to try and win every game to finish first.”Guardiola confirmed Silva is may miss the busy festive period but Aguero may return from a muscle injury in time to face Everton on Saturday, live on Sky Sports.last_img read more

A look at religion in 2018 with Pastor Miles McPherson

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- As 2018 comes to an end we’re taking a look back at how religion played a role in the headlines, from an increase in religious hate crimes to communities rising up to break stereotypes.Joining KUSI to discuss more is Pastor Miles McPherson from the Rock Church.If you’re interested in Christmas services at Rock Church:Special Christmas worship – Friday December 21st at 6:30 p.m. at the Point Loma CampusChristmas Services Sunday- all campuses (4 service times)Christmas Eve service 4 p.m.- all campusesAll information can be found at SDrock.com December 19, 2018 A look at religion in 2018 with Pastor Miles McPherson Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: December 19, 2018last_img read more

Network Communications Strikes Restructuring Agreement

first_imgLawrenceville, Georgia-based housing publisher Network Communications Inc. has struck an agreement with the majority of its shareholders over a balance sheet restructuring to reduce the company’s outstanding indebtedness from approximately $300 million to approximately $115 million, as well as slash its annual interest expense. The new restructuring agreement includes the extension and amendment of the company’s existing revolving loan and term loan facilities; the cancellation of NCI’s outstanding 10-3/4 senior notes due 2013 in the aggregate principal amount of $175 million in exchange for 100 percent of the new common stock of NCI and new senior subordinated pay-in-kind notes in an aggregate principal amount of up to $45 million; the cancellation of NCI’s 12 percent senior subordinated notes, due 2013, in the aggregate principal amount of $25 million (accredited to approximately $49 million) in exchange for a portion of the warrants to purchase 5 percent of the New Common Stock of NCI at an exercise price that implies a total enterprise value of $200 million; and the cancellation of the company’s existing equity interests in exchange for a portion of the warrants. In June, NCI defaulted on its interest payment on its 10-3/4 senior notes due 2013, which prompted the restructuring negotiations. According to the company’s most recent financial statement filed with the SEC, NCI reported a net loss of $10.5 million through its fiscal third quarter (period ended December 6), compared to a loss of $83.4 during the same period the prior year. Revenues were $105.1 million, a decline of 24.2 percent.In January 2010, NCI chairman and CEO Dan McCarthy and CFO Gerry Parker signed new five-year contracts with Court Square Capital Partners, the owners of NCI.last_img read more

Cyndi Stivers Joins AOL As Homepage EditorInChief

first_imgAOL has hired Cyndi Stivers as its new homepage editor-in-chief. Her appointment signals the company’s efforts to remake AOL.com as a destination site that more effectively curates content from its network of brands.Starting in June, Stivers will head up the editorial programming on AOL’s homepage, its associated apps and syndicated feeds, says Chris Grosso, AOL’s senior vice president and general manager of AOL homepages.Stivers, who will report to Grosso, is currently editor-in-chief of Columbia Journalism Review, a post she took in late 2011 after leaving Time Inc. earlier in the year following the Jack Griffin shake-up. “As we evolve AOL.com as a content destination, we will look to Cyndi to ensure the site showcases the most compelling stories relevant to our viewers and drive a distinctive editorial voice,” says Grosso. “We’ll also be relying on her creativity to help us ignite our live programming and add more opportunities for visitors to engage with each other around our content.”Stivers was a founding editor of Time Out New York and later joined Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia to help launch the company’s Sirius satellite ratio channel, where she worked with then president and CEO Susan Lyne, currently AOL’s brand group CEO.last_img read more