ABS Gives AIP to Hudongs GTT MARK III Flex LNG Carrier

first_imgzoomImage by WMN Classification society American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) granted approval in principle (AIP) to Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding’s large LNG carrier with MARK III Flex membrane cargo containment system.Specifically, the Chinese shipbuilder received the approval for its 174,000 cbm GTT MARK III Flex design.“ABS is pleased to award Hudong-Zhonhua this AIP for their design to help meet the industry’s diversifying LNG shipping requirements, in this growing segment,” Vassilios Kroustallis, Vice President Europe Regional Business Development, ABS, commented.He added that the classification society continues to review advanced LNG designs.“Working with ABS through the AIP process we have demonstrated our ability to meet our clients’ requirements for more efficient LNG vessel design,” Chi Benbing, Vice President, Hudong-Zhonghua, said.Through this partnership with ABS, Hudong-Zhonghua can now offer its clients designs using both GTT membrane containment systems, MARK III Flex and NO 96 series.This allows the Chinese shipbuilder to use different kinds of cargo containment systems to best meet diversified requirements throughout the LNG carrier’s life.In December last year, Hudong-Zhonghua also received AIP from ABS for its very large ethane carrier (VLEC) concept. The VLEC is equipped with a specialized membrane cargo containment system suited to carry liquid gas cargoes such as ethane and propane.last_img read more

Batchewana FN disappointed Ontario appealing Robinson Huron win

first_imgWikwemikong Chief Duke Peltier, Wasauksing Chief Warren Tabobondung, Shawanaga Chief Wayne Pamajewon, Batchewana Chief Dean Sayersn on June 4, 2018, at the start of final arguments in the Robinson Huron Treaty Annuities court case. (APTN file.)APTN NewsAn Ontario First Nation is reeling after learning the Ford government is appealing the Robinson Huron annuities claim – including costs.The federal government has said it will not appeal the December 2018 decision.“The provincial government has a fiduciary obligation to honour our treaties and Ontario’s decision to appeal the ruling is unacceptable,” Batchewana Chief Dean Sayers said in a release.“For decades, our people have received the vastly inadequate annual amount that is nowhere near the value of our shared resources of this land.”An Ontario Superior Court judge sided with 21 First Nations late last year when she said annual $4 treaty payments should be raised.Justice Patricia Hennessy found the provincial and federal governments had been short-changing First Nations in Ontario for more than a century.But she did not set a new amount under the Robinson-Huron Treaty, which was signed in 1850.Now comes word Ontario has filed notice seeking leave to appeal the decision.Although Sayers believes the judge’s decision will hold and Ontario will come to the table and negotiate instead of litigate.“Batchewana is disappointed in the province’s decision, however, we are confident that Ontario and Canada will follow through on their inherited obligation through a mediated process,” he said in the release.The treaty payments are a share of natural resource revenues within the territory.There are about 30,000 beneficiaries in the 21 communities.last_img read more