Jonny Fa’amatuainu citing decision

first_imgThe possible ‘entry points’ for a dangerous tackle in contravention of Law 10.4(e) are lower end: two (2) weeks; mid-range: six (6) weeks; and top end: 10 weeks or more.  Having determined the appropriate ‘entry point’, the independent judicial officer was then required to consider whether that ‘entry point’ should be varied to take into account any mitigating factors (such as the player’s conduct, remorse and plea) and any aggravating factors (such as his previous record and any need for deterrence). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jonny Fa’amatuainu, the Scarlets player (No 19) today (Wednesday, 13 October) appeared at the ERC Offices in Dublin for a disciplinary hearing before an independent judicial officer as a result of a citing complaint arising from the Round 1 Heineken Cup match between the Scarlets and Perpignan at Parc y Scarlets on Saturday, 9 October.The citing complaint was for a dangerous tackle in contravention of Law 10.4(e).  In particular, Mr Fa’amatuainu was alleged to have committed a dangerous tackle on Perpignan player Adrien Plante (No 14).Mr Fa’amatuainu pleaded guilty to the citing complaint, but asserted that his actions had not warranted a red card. After considering the evidence and hearing submissions from Mr Fa’amatuainu and Roger O’Connor, ERC’s Disciplinary Officer, the independent judicial officer, Antony Davies (England), determined that Mr Fa’amatuainu had committed the act of foul play and imposed a suspension of three (3) weeks. Mr Fa’amatuainu will be free to play again on 3 November, 2010.Under the Disciplinary Rules for the 2010/11 Heineken Cup, independent judicial officers are required to follow the sanctioning regime laid down by the International Rugby Board.  Accordingly, having found that Mr Fa’amatuainu had committed an act of foul play, the independent judicial officer was required to determine the ‘entry point’ for Mr Fa’amatuainu’s suspension, based on an assessment of the seriousness of his actions.center_img In this case, the independent judicial officer determined that the appropriate ‘entry point’ was six (6) weeks based on Mr Fa’amatuainu’s recklessness and the vulnerable position of Mr Plante. The independent judicial officer then decreased the suspension by three (3) weeks to take into account (among other mitigating factors) Mr Fa’amatuainu’s acknowledgement of guilt, good disciplinary record and remorse which resulted in the final suspension of three (3) weeks.The independent judicial officer ordered Mr Fa’amatuainu to pay the costs of the hearing.last_img read more

Nutrition: Plan your intake of protein

first_imgBy James Morehen Hear more from James and the expert team at Nutrition X through the Ultimate Rugby Guide campaign @Nutrition_X, www.nutritionx.co.uk The type of protein source can also have an effect on the muscle protein synthetic rates. For example, whey protein has a greater rate of synthesis than both casein or soy based proteins. Therefore, straight after exercise or a game it would be ideal to consume whey based sources of protein (white meats) due to the speed at which whey increases the blood amino acid concentrations. Conversely, casein protein is digested and absorbed slower with a prolonged breakdown of its amino acid complex. Therefore, following their world cup games players will most probably consume casein based protein sources pre-bed to supply the muscles whilst they sleep. Milk is great to consume in the evening as approximately 80% of the protein in milk is casein based and 20% is whey based. James Morehen is the Sports Scientist at Nutrition X, Sports Performance Nutritionist at Widnes Vikings Rugby League team and lead strength and conditioning intern coach at Liverpool John Moores University.James Morehen is part of the team who have developed Nutrition X’s range of Informed-Sport certified products, which have become the No.1 choice of sports nutrition for numerous elite athletes, amateur sports people and casual gym users alike. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ProteinThe Rugby World Cup squads will be educating all of their players on the importance of proteins. Proteins are not only essential for life but are crucial for many key functions in the rugby player. One function, constantly strived for by rugby players is the synthesis and growth of new proteins to out-weigh the process of protein breakdown. The net result of having a greater summation of synthesis over degradation is an increase in lean muscle mass, a vital component of any successful rugby player. It is important to highlight that of the 20 amino acids used to make proteins, 9 of these are classed as essential, the rest being non-essential. The 9 essential amino acids must be consumed in our diet, as the body cannot make these like it can for the non-essential amino acids.Although, the supplement market is saturated with companies marketing themselves with the biggest content of protein per serving, the greatest anabolic potential or the key to ‘big muscles’, the actual protein requirement for the majority of rugby players can be consumed from food based sources. A motto taught to me early on, and one that I educate my players on, is that “You cant supplement a poor diet, food has to come first before any supplement, lets not substitute a diet with products but supplement it, when and if we have too”.Continuing further, although during the tournament we will witness some very muscular players on our TV screens, the actual protein requirement for a rugby player is still unclear. However, what we do know is that the typical protein requirement for these players is generally higher than the average sedentary Joe Bloggs. With this in mind, can these needs be consumed through a diet alone, or do we need the common ‘shake’ on top? I guess the answer lies with how big the player in question is. For example, an 80kg scrum half consuming 2 g/kg would find it a lot easier to consume his protein requirements from food alone when compared to a 120kg second row, 160g versus 240g total (6 versus ten chicken breasts) respectively.Strategically, it is far better to consume protein throughout the day evenly in pulses rather than bolus ingestions at typical meal times (breakfast, lunch, dinner). In line, it would be advisable for players to consume protein especially before and after gym or field sessions to ensure a positive net balance between synthesis and degradation. Current research suggests that approximately 20-30g (0.3 g/kg) in each pulse is ideal to be consumed after exercise and regularly throughout the day.A common mistake witnessed with rugby players is training in the morning without consuming any source of protein, resulting in a net loss of muscle protein. This is critical, as this habit accumulating over time will witness players beginning to drop weight, but more importantly a gradual loss of lean muscle mass. To overcome this issue, it is key to consume high quality sources of protein in the morning before any exercise. The World Cup Squads will typically have protein stations ranging from scrambled egg, omelette, fish, meat, and milk in the dining hall for breakfast and throughout the day. Overall, the general rule of thumb with protein intake is to consume food based sources 4 times per day spread evenly, prior to and post exercise, to stimulate suitable protein synthesis. This should be a variety of meat, diary, fish, nuts and pulses and for convenience a commercial whey based shake high in leucine content can be consumed if in a hurry or to top up your daily intake. Vegetarian sources can include the legume family, grains like quinoa, beans and tofu. Pre-bed, a casein based shake would provide a slow releasing supply of protein whilst you sleep.In summary, this first two blogs have been written with a goal to educate the lay player. Unfortunately, we are not all part of a World Cup squad and so the likelihood is we have to look after our own nutritional demands and needs daily and throughout the week. The next blog will focus on the importance of getting nutrition correct in the lead up to a game but for now these are the top tips to remember from Blog 1 and 2.Top TipsFood first approachBe prepared and smart with your carbohydrate and protein intakeAlways apply the 3 T’s model to both macronutrientsCarbohydrates must be consumed for rugby training and performance but playaround with the GI of sources and quantity dependent on the phase of the weekThe overall weekly intake of carbohydrate intake will change dailyCarbohydrates will replenish, restore and aid recovery following exercise and agameConsume good quality sources of protein daily every spread evenlyDo not skip protein at breakfastWhey is best pre and post exerciseCasein is best before bedLastly, you can’t supplement a poor diet!last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgJapanThey ended up as the losing side, but Japan still deserve high praise for their performance against Wales in Cardiff. Juan LeguizamonThe Argentine replacement gave away the crucial penalty which Greig Laidlaw kicked to steal a 19-16 win for Scotland at BT Murrayfield.With Scotland pressing through the phases, Juan Leguizamon flung himself at the feet of the ball carrier and referee Ben O’Keeffe awarded a penalty for a no-arms tackle. Laidlaw made no mistake from the tee and Argentina were doomed. The Saints Camille LopezHe could have been a hero for France as, with his team trailing 25-23, Camille Lopez attempted a match-winning drop-goal. Instead he is a villain as his kick from just over 30m out went wide and the Wallabies hung on for the win. Catch him if you can: Semesa Rokoduguni on the attack for England. (Photo: Getty Images)Semesa RokoduguniThe England wing won the Man of the Match award for scoring two tries in his team’s 58-15 win over Fiji and making a major nuisance of himself in attack and defence.Two years after Semesa Rokoduguni was given his first cap by former England boss Stuart Lancaster, he was recalled by current England chief Eddie Jones for his second Test appearance.Rokoduguni repaid Jones in style, making a break in the opening minutes which helped set up the first England try for Jonathan Joseph, then scoring a try of his own 13 minutes into the match.He added another try midway through the second half and although he had failed to stop the man mountain that is Nemani Nadolo when he crashed over for Fiji’s first try after 32 minutes, there weren’t many blots on Rokoduguni’s copybook.He made 139m with the ball in hand, beating six defenders and making six clean breaks. He put in ten successful tackles too (the best tally among the England backs), though Joe Launchbury topped the tackle count with 14. Carlo CannaThe Italy fly-half kicked the match-winning penalty in his team’s astonishing 20-18 triumph over South Africa.Thrashed 68-10 by New Zealand last week, Italy bounced back in style and Carlo Canna kicked two conversions and the crucial 65th minute penalty to bring home the bacon.Italy’s tries were scored by Andries van Schalkwyk, from a rolling maul, and Giovanbattista Venditti, while Edoardo Padovani kicked a penalty. Major plaudits also go to Italy’s new coach Conor O’Shea. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS High and not handsome: Malakai Fekitoa tackles Simon Zebo. (Photo: Inpho)New Zealand’s high hittersThe All Blacks put in too many head high tackles during their 21-9 win over Ireland. Malakai Fekitoa was sin-binned for his high challenge on Simon Zebo in the 49th minute and he was certainly not the only culprit. Yes, strong defence is essential in Test-match rugby, but aggression must stay on the right side of the law.Fekitoa will face a citing panel this week along with Sam Cane, who knocked out Robbie Henshaw after just 11 minutes of the match. Referee Jaco Peyper and his team of officials were happy that it was an accidental clash, as Henshaw spun into the tackle. but Cane has been cited since the match.Peyper incurred some Irish wrath when he refused to use the Television Match Official to determine if all the passes in the lead-up to New Zealand’s third try were legal. Beauden Barrett’s offload to TJ Perenara and Perenara’s pass to Fekitoa both looked like they might have been forward, but when Ireland skipper Rory Best asked Peyper to take a look, the referee said he and his assistants were happy.With 15 minutes left to play and the scoreline still tight, it might have been better to double check. WalesThere are Sinners all over the Wales team after their dreadful performance in their 33-30 win over Japan. Wales head coach Rob Howley admitted: “Japan deserved to win. Whilst we have come away with a win, it certainly felt like a loss,” and criticism rained down on the men in red after a plodding, indecisive showing.Former Wales full-back Gareth Thomas is usually a positive pundit, but even he was critical on BBC’s Scrum V show. “The speed of our game was too slow. I don’t want to see the nine putting his foot on the ball and standing, waiting for a bus.”Thomas also criticised the selection for being too conservative. “Sam Davies came on and probably did more in ten minutes than Gareth Anscombe had done for the whole 70.”Among the Sinners is Liam Williams, who was sin-binned for blocking Akihito Yamada as the Japan wing tried to chase his own kick up to the try-line. Williams could have joined Alex Cuthbert in chasing back to try to beat Yamada to the ball, but instead he tried a cynical block and didn’t get away with it.Gareth Anscombe threw a horrible, careless pass in the vague direction of Cuthbert only for Yamada to pounce on the loose ball and run in from his own half to score a try which left Japan trailing just 14-13 at half-time.A complete lack of urgency in defence allowed Kenki Fukuoka to score a try which made it 24-20 with 26 minutes to go and Japan tied the scores at 30-30 when Liam Williams was turned over and Kotaro Matsushima turned defence into attack, which resulted in a try for Amanaki Lotoahea.Cuthbert butchered a fabulous try-scoring chance when he chased a brilliant kick from Sam Davies up the left and let the ball slip away as he slid over the line with it. Cuthbert was left sitting with his head in his hands in disbelief. Chance gone: Alex Cuthbert knocks the ball on right on the line. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)The Sinnerscenter_img Akihito Yamada and Kotaro Matsushima caused Wales huge problems in attack, making 116 and 113m with the ball in hand respectively. Amanaki Lotoahea and Amanaki Mafi also had Wales back-pedalling, while No 8 Mafi was the top tackler in the match with 18.Attacking intent: Amanaki Mafi caused Wales all kinds of problems. (Photo: Getty Images)Tevita KuridraniThe Australia wing scored arguably the try of the weekend, fending off France flanker Charles Ollivon and acrobatically touching the ball down one-handed with his body in mid-flight, over the touchline.That third try in as many games for Tevita Kuridrani put Australia ahead and they managed to hold out sustained France attacks and hang on for the win.Premiership starsThere was a full Aviva Premiership programme this weekend and among the players who produced match-winning performances for their clubs was Stephen Myler, who kicked all Northampton’s points in an 18-17 win at Worcester Warriors.Will Chudley scored the bonus-point try for Exeter Chiefs in the last five minutes as they won 32-19 at Newcastle Falcons, while Freddie Burns scored ten points and created a try for Owen Williams as Leicester beat Harlequins 25-6.Gloucester, who have miss-fired badly in the Premiership this season, pulled off the surprise domestic result of the weekend, beating high-flying Wasps 36-18. Tries by Richard Hibbard, Mark Atkinson, Matt Scott, Charlie Sharples and Henry Purdy gave the Cherry and Whites only their second Premiership win of the season. All smiles: Eddie Jones has plenty to be happy about. (Photo: Getty Images) Oh no! Sean O’Brien shows his frustration at the missed chances. (Photo: Inpho)Sean O’Brien and Josh van der FlierIreland went in search of a winning double over New Zealand and were still in the game at half-time, trailing just 14-6.Malakai Fekitoa was then sin-binned for a high tackle on Simon Zebo and Ireland put together a good period of pressure, enjoying 80% possession in the first 20 minutes of the second half. England, Scotland, Italy and Australia all had winning smiles, Ireland, Argentina and South Africa tasted defeat and although Wales were victorious, they had little to shout about. Waiting game: Sam Davies watches his drop-goal head for the posts. (Photo: Getty Images)Sam DaviesWales’s replacement fly-half spared some of his country’s blushes when he kicked the drop-goal which gave them a 33-30 win over Japan in Cardiff.But Wales still attracted a huge amount of criticism for an error-strewn, lacklustre performance against a team they should expect to beat comfortably.There were just seconds to go when Davies was teed up after the Wales forwards had trucked the ball up into the 22. He nailed the kick from about 30m out in front of the posts and so stole the victory, but it was a bitter-sweet win for Wales. Grinning Greig: Laidlaw celebrates after landing the winning penalty. (Photo: Getty Images)Greig LaidlawThe Scotland skipper kicked 14 of Scotland’s points in their 19-16 win over Argentina, including a last-gasp penalty which gave them the win.Greig Laidlaw converted Sean Maitland’s try from the touchline and landed four penalties. He missed with one potentially match-winning penalty, which bounced back off the upright, so he could have been a Sinner not a Saint. The same goes for Finn Russell, who put a drop-goal a fraction wide.However, Laidlaw found the target when it mattered most and the win puts Scotland up to eighth place in the World Rugby rankings – a useful place to be as the World Cup seedings will be taken from the rankings in May. Eddie JonesThe England boss has guided his team to 11 straight wins in his first year in charge, but it is not just that success on the field which makes him a Saint. I have sat in countless post-match press conferences in 17 years of doing this job and Eddie Jones brings a fun factor which other England bosses couldn’t manage, even when they were winning.He sat beaming at the top table after Saturday’s 58-15 win over Fiji and refused to criticise England for conceding three tries. Instead, he got the assembled media chuckling with his unique turns of phrase – some achievement considering he had riled them a couple of days before by delaying his team announcement.Here are some of his most positive and funny lines from Saturday night:“It was a really good performance. If you look at their World Cup record from last year, to score 58 points against Fiji is outstanding.”“We dropped off at certain times, but it is difficult when you race away to a big lead to maintain that intensity.”Soap star? Eddie’s East Ender Kyle Sinckler. (Photo: Getty Images)“We are not going to play the perfect game – you play the perfect game and you can retire.”“We are only 11 games into what we have started here. We are only just getting out of the shallow end.”“Leone Nakarawa is the LeBron James of rugby. He can do anything. It’s quite incredible, the skills he has.”“ Young Sinckler, out of East Enders, did alright for us too! He showed he can run the ball. He’s got amazing acceleration.” They tried to breach the defence from attacking lineouts several times, but individual errors cost them dear.Sean O’Brien spilled the ball with the try-line beckoning after a superb lineout take from Jamie Heaslip. Then, a few minutes later, Josh van der Flier tried an over-ambitious offload to Andrew Trimble off the floor when he was just five metres from the line. If van der Flier had recycled the ball Ireland might have been able to maintain the momentum, but instead Julian Savea snaffled it, the All Blacks cleared the danger and went on to win 21-9.last_img read more

Zander Fagerson scores bizarre try as Scotland beat Italy

first_imgZANDER FAGERSON SCORES POSSIBLY THE SLOWEST TRY OF ALL TIME!!!!— The Pen (@thepenGW) November 14, 2020 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Zander Fagerson scores bizarre try as Scotland beat ItalyZander Fagerson scored a bizarre try in Scotland’s 28-17 bonus-point victory over Italy in the Autumn Nations Cup in Florence.The try came in the 50th minute of the match after strong build-up work from Scotland wing Duhan van der Merwe. Hamish Watson then took play to within a few metres of the line and as he passed from the floor the ball took a deflection from the fingertips of Italy No 8 Jake Polledri and fell into the hands of Fagerson.The unusual trajectory of the ball appeared to catch players off-guard and many stopped playing while Fagerson strolled over the line – or “trundled” in the words of TMO Wayne Barnes as he checked whether there had been any infringements in the build-up.Even Fagerson himself looked a little bemused as he crossed the line, but it was a harsh reminder to the Italy team to always play to the referee’s whistle.Here are a few reactions to the try from social media… Easiest try @ZanderFagerson (or anyone) will ever score.— Nathan Hines (@Wagga5) November 14, 2020 Watch LIVE on #PrimeVideo pic.twitter.com/cR0Av4fkA3— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) November 14, 2020Scott Cummings and George Turner also scored tries from close range to ensure Scotland left Florence with a try bonus point as well as the victory.Yet Italy scored the best try of the game. That first-half five-pointer began when Paolo Garbisi released Marco Zanon, who bumped off several Scotland defenders as he broke deep into the opposition half.Zanon then offloaded to Marcello Violi, who in turn found Mattia Bellini and he then released Matteo Minozzi to run in from close range.You can watch the Minozzi try here… FORZA AZZURRI What a reply from @federugby Watch the second half LIVE on #PrimeVideo pic.twitter.com/abMwVIyD9p— Amazon Prime Video Sport (@primevideosport) November 14, 2020This was Scotland’s fifth straight Test win and they will be looking to make it six by beating France for the second time in 2020 when they meet at BT Murrayfield next weekend. Memorable score: Zander Fagerson scored one of Scotland’s four tries against Italy (Getty Images) Zander Fagerson happy at scoring his bizarre try, described as being like a ‘tranquilized water buffalo’ #ITAvSCO #autumninternationals pic.twitter.com/4yZ3r3xefW— Rugger Perv (@Ruggerperv) November 14, 2020Duhan van der Merwe had scored the opening try for Scotland in the 25th minute, picking a brilliant line to take Ali Price’s pass and cut between two Italian defenders. Here it is… A first try of the #AutumnNationsCup for @scotlandteam The Scotland prop scores as Gregor Townsend’s side secure bonus-point win in Florence Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Video: Rob Radtke on the enthronement

first_img Tags By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 21, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] Rob Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development, reflects on the enthronement of the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Archbishop of Canterbury, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Video: Rob Radtke on the enthronement The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Justin Welby Enthronement, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Video Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Servicelast_img read more

TEXAS: Explosion leaves Episcopalians dazed, but ready to help

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Diocese of Texas] As of the morning of April 18, reports confirm Episcopalians from West, Texas, are safe after the devastating explosion of a fertilizer plant, according to officials from St. Paul’s, Holy Spirit, and St. Alban’s in Waco, just 15 miles to the south. However, countless others have been affected either physically or emotionally.Late Wednesday night, an explosion from a fire at a fertilizer plant injured more than 150 people and killed between five and 15 others. The blast destroyed or damaged more than 50 homes and several buildings, including a nursing home, intermediate school and grocery store. The impact was strong enough to register a 2.1 earthquake.“It felt like a bomb and sounded like a bomb,” said Joanna Strom, a West resident who is also the parish secretary for St. Paul’s in Waco. “It was like an atom bomb went off. It was insane looking in the sky, like a mushroom cloud. I can’t even describe it to you.Strom, who lives a few miles from the fertilizer plant, knew there was something wrong immediately. Her home was far enough away that it didn’t suffer any damage, but she was concerned about her friends.“I know everyone in West because it’s a small town,” Strom said. “I tried to text everyone I knew. Some of them were OK, and some were unaccounted for. Some people were staying at the local hotel. The problem was that it was total chaos last night. Nobody knew where anybody was, and it was dark.”Soon after the explosion, the power went out in most areas. And soon after that, the cell phone systems were overloaded. Strom resorted to using Facebook to send out updates to her loved ones.On Thursday, her husband dropped her off at work and returned to West to try to search for their friends. If she had not recently broken an ankle, Strom said, she would be out there looking too for the people she considers family.“When I was diagnosed with cancer, that community came together and they did a fundraiser for me,” she said. “I know everybody there. It is very upsetting to me. It’s like they are my family, and I don’t know how they are doing.”The Rev. Chuck Treadwell, rector St. Paul’s, said everyone was accounted for at their church and school. Holy Spirit, Waco, reported that a couple of their families lived in West, but they are ok, although one of the families had to be evacuated. St. Alban’s, Waco, also reported everyone as safe.Calls have flooded churches throughout the diocese with generous and worried Episcopalians eager to help the people of West.“We’re like everyone else, waiting to see how we can respond next,” Treadwell said. “Everybody in Waco is sitting on pins and needles waiting to go to the rescue.”Mark Felton is a St. Paul’s vestry member and also the executive director for the Heart of Texas chapter of the American Red Cross. He advised everyone to donate to the Red Cross. People in the central Texas area are also encourage to donate blood if possible.Additionally, the Diocese of Texas disaster response unit is prepared to take action. Archdeacon Russ Oeschel and the Rev. Gill Keyworth are working on a deployment of the Spiritual Care Teams, which could take place as early as next week.As more information becomes available, the Diocese of Texas will keep everyone informed of the best ways to take action. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release By Luke BlountPosted Apr 18, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TEXAS: Explosion leaves Episcopalians dazed, but ready to helplast_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_imgRapidísimas Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME En una reunión entre el Vaticano y un comité de la ONU, el Vaticano reconoció que no existe ninguna excusa válida para los casos de abuso y violencia contra niños, al tiempo que enfatizó que existen responsables de abusos “en todas las profesiones”, incluso “entre miembros del clero”, señaló Silvano Tomasi, representante de la Santa Sede ante Naciones Unidas en Ginebra. En una entrevista con CNN el sacerdote argentino Carlos Mullins, radicado en Nueva York,  dijo que estos escándalos han costado caro a la iglesia, pero aún más moralmente. Esta es la primera vez que la jerarquía de la Iglesia Católica Romana participa en un escrutinio público sobre los abusos sexuales contra menores cometidos por sacerdotes en todo el mundo.No sólo los hombres. Yingluck Shinawatra, primera ministra de Tailandia que ha gobernado a su país con mano dura ha dicho “que no piensa dimitir del cargo”. La oposición se organiza aunque no quiere provocar una guerra civil. Tailandia es el país más grande en el sudeste asiático con una población de más de 64 millones de habitantes. Su etnia es 75 por ciento thai-chino. La religión predominante es el budismo, su capital es Bangkok. Antes se llamaba Siam.En una larga comparecencia televisiva el presidente Barack Obama advirtió del peligro de las drogas y dijo que “fumar marihuana es igual de peligroso que beber alcohol”. Johnny Ventura, el popular cantante y compositor dominicano, dijo en una entrevista que sin dudas las drogas conducen a tres lugares: al hospital, a la cárcel o al cementerio. Añadió que en cada Nochebuena hay “pan de frutas” en su mesa como recordatorio constante de que cuando niño era tan pobre que ese era el único plato que su madre podía servir.Una compañía argentina-italiana está preparando un documental sobre el papa Francisco que se llamará “Francisco de Buenos Aires” y que se estrenará el 13 de marzo al cumplirse el primer año de su papado. Los productores cuentan con más de 50,000 horas de grabaciones. El documental aborda temas que van desde su pasión por el fútbol y el club San Lorenzo, pasando por su deleite por la música, la literatura y la amistad con el escritor agnóstico Jorge Luis Borges. El trabajo no excluye temas polémicos como su vida durante la dictadura y su militancia en el peronismo. También habla de su interés en el diálogo ecuménico e inter-religioso sus relaciones con importantes personalidades de la vida argentina, así como su interés por los pobres y desamparados.Siguiendo el ejemplo de ayudar a jóvenes cubanos que quieren superarse académicamente, la Universidad del Sagrado Corazón en San Juan, Puerto Rico, ha otorgado una beca a Anyer Antonio Blanco para que haga sus estudios de bachillerato esa institución. La beca  lleva el nombre de Jerónimo Esteve Abril, en honor al fundador de Bella Internacional, distribuidores de los automóviles Honda. Cualquier otra cosa que le falte será cubierta por el legislador puertorriqueño Kenneth McClintock y la comunidad cubana exilada. Anyer fue preso político por seis años en Santiago de Cuba.A los 83 años ha fallecido en la Ciudad de México, Juan Gelman, laureado poeta ruso ucraniano hijo de refugiados judíos nacido en Argentina. Durante su vida el poeta sufrió la desaparición de su hijo Marcelo y su esposa embarazada María Claudia en la época de la violencia de la dictadura militar (1976-1983). Como era práctica común en ese tiempo los padres fueron asesinados y su hija regalada, en su caso a un oficial del ejército uruguayo. Después de 22 años se pudo demostrar que la niña era hija de los Gelman.Un momento culminante de su saga fue el encuentro de la niña desaparecida después de 22 años y sus abuelos biológicos. Gelman perteneció a grupos de izquierda como la organización terrorista Montoneros por lo que guardó prisión en más de una ocasión. Actualmente era considerado el mejor poeta argentino del siglo XX.Una “pequeña” decisión de las autoridades de Río de Janeiro puede traer grandes consecuencias en la vida social de Brasil. Desde ya las empleadas domésticas no podrán ser obligadas a usar uniformes en su trabajo, una costumbre que data desde los tiempos de la esclavitud. Se espera que otras ciudades adopten la misma ley. También la ley prohíbe que las empleadas y sus empleadores utilicen diferentes elevadores para llegar a su trabajo.EJEMPLO: Jesús a sus discípulos: “El sirvo no sabe lo que hace su amo… los llamo mis amigos”. San Juan 15:14. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Por Onell A. SotoPosted Jan 22, 2014 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

RIP: Former Chicago Bishop Suffragan William Wiedrich

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Obituary, Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release People Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID House of Bishops, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By ENS staffPosted Dec 5, 2014 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA RIP: Former Chicago Bishop Suffragan William Wiedrich Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In this 1994 photo, Diocese of Chicago Bishop Suffragan William Wiedrich, second from left, joins other Chicago-area faith leaders in an ecumenical service for those living with HIV/AIDS. Photo: Jack Spratt/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Bishop William Wiedrich, suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago from 1991 to 1997, died on Nov. 26 at an assisted living facility in Muskegon, Michigan.He was 83 and had suffered from Alzheimer’s disease for some time, according to an announcement from Diocese of Chicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee.Wiedrich was born in 1931 in Stambaugh, Michigan, and in 1956 received his Master of Divinity degree from Bexley Hall Seminary. He was ordained a deacon in 1956 and a priest in 1957 by Diocese of Northern Michigan Bishop Herman R. Page Jr.Wiedrich spent the first 25 years of his ministry in Northern Michigan, serving congregations in Newberry, Munising, Houghton and Sault Ste. Marie. In 1981, he became rector of the historic Grace Episcopal Church across from the state capitol in Madison, Wisconsin.In October 1990, at age 59, he was elected bishop suffragan in Chicago, and he was ordained and consecrated on Feb. 23, 1991. When he was elected, then-Bishop of Chicago Frank Griswold (who later was elected the 25th presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church) said Wiedrich “brings with him a wealth of experience, particularly in small congregations…. He has a pastor’s heart and a wonderful way of weaving story into the proclaiming of the Gospel.”Wiedrich is survived by his wife, Tress, and their sons, Tom and Bill. Funeral services are pending.last_img read more

Church of Sweden, Episcopal Church celebrate partnership and common mission

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID November 22, 2015 at 7:00 am Since 2010, the Church of Denmark is no longer an observer but rather a full member of the Porvoo Communion. See, e.g., http://eurobishop.blogspot.com/2010/10/church-of-denmark-signs-porvoo.html Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion, Featured Events Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal News Service] The longstanding partnership between The Episcopal Church and the (Lutheran) Church of Sweden was formally celebrated during a Eucharist service at Uppsala Cathedral on Nov. 18 at the close of the church’s General Synod.Former Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori joined the celebration, during which Church of Sweden Archbishop Antje Jackelén offered a prayer for The Episcopal Church and Jefferts Schori offered one for the Church of Sweden.“The relationship between the Svenska Kyrkan and The Episcopal Church has been a gift to both for nearly three centuries.  Recognizing and affirming that as a full-communion relationship will enable us to be far stronger partners in God’s mission,” said Jefferts Schori, in an e-mail message following the service. “We share a great deal, beginning with histories of migration, and we have very similar ways of worship, doing theology, and engaging ecumenical and interreligious dialogue.“This is a living partnership which will undoubtedly grow far deeper in coming years, particularly in this season in ministry with migrants, where we meet Jesus in the other.”The Episcopal Church and the Church of Sweden have for centuries have been in relationship.“The churches have had good relations for quite a long time,” said Jackelén, in a news clip. “We have taken it for granted. Now we feel it is time to look into the process and see how we can further our partnership.”The relationship between the two churches dates to the mid-18th century, when in Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania there were some instances of Eucharistic sharing and priests serving across denominations without re-ordination.“Both churches are actively involved in the striving for greater unity between Christians in the ecumenical movement,” according to a declaration read during the Nov. 18 service. “We desire to deepen this fellowship. We ask God at this moment to bless this undertaking and give the Episcopal Church and the Church of Sweden the grace to serve the Gospel of Jesus Christ together when it is called for. We will pray for each other.”During her nine-year term as presiding bishop, Jefferts Schori, whose great-grandparents emigrated from Sweden to the United States in the late 19th century, visited the Church of Sweden several times and encouraged the relationship and cooperation between the two churches to be deepened.During a Nov. 15-18 visit to Sweden, she was joined by the Rev. Chuck Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church, and the Rev. Margaret Rose, ecumenical and interreligious officer for The Episcopal Church. Earlier in the week, they attended the Church of Sweden’s General Synod and visited Katerina Church in Stockholm, which is working with the local mosque and Islamic Relief to house refugees and provide immigration assistance.Representatives of both churches met at the close of they synod to speak not just about the past, but also the future, said Rose, in an e-mail message.“How to learn from each other in the area of interreligious relations, partnership with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Swedish churches abroad, discussing questions of church state relations,  refugee resettlement,  gender justice and the continuation of our shared  work on climate change,” she said. “The Church of Sweden shares a liturgical  and  governance  tradition that is akin to ours. In these challenging times, we are both looking at the call of the Gospel to challenge  our churches’ engagement in a world beyond our walls.”The 78th General Convention, meeting last summer in Salt Lake City, commended through Resolution B004 the recently published “Report on the Grounds for Future Relations Between the Church of Sweden and The Episcopal Church,” and called on the presiding bishop to explore ways for the relationship with the Church of Sweden to be deepened.Each church has entered into local full-communion agreements between Anglicans and Lutherans and many regard it as a natural development for the Church of Sweden and The Episcopal Church to recognize that they are in full communion with one another. “The recognition of this relationship will better equip each international church to minister in presence, mission, and advocacy throughout the world,” according to the explanation that accompanied the proposed General Convention resolution.The Church of Sweden is a member of the Porvoo Communion, which groups the British and Irish Anglican churches and the Nordic and Baltic Lutheran churches that entered into a full communion agreement in 1992 to “share a common life in mission and service.”The churches that signed the agreement are the Evangelical Lutheran churches of Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden, and the Anglican churches of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The Lusitanian Church in Portugal and the Reformed Episcopal Church of Spain — both extra-provincial dioceses under the authority of the Archbishop of Canterbury — also signed onto the agreement. The Evangelical Lutheran churches of Denmark and Latvia have observer status.The name Porvoo comes from the town in Finland where a joint celebration of Holy Communion was held after the formal signing of the agreement in Järvenpää.With 6.9 million members in 13 dioceses, the Church of Sweden — known locally as Svenska Kyrkan — is the world’s largest Evangelical Lutheran Church and a member of the Lutheran World Federation.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Church of Sweden, Episcopal Church celebrate partnership and common mission Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 20, 2015 Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC David Cornell says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Disciplinary hearing for Los Angeles’ Bruno concludes without decision

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Donald Heacock says: Vernon Sheldon-Witter says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags March 31, 2017 at 8:47 pm Thank you, Mary Frances. You make the arcane fiduciary detail comprehensible.My prayers will be with the Hearing Panel as they deliberate. Rector Shreveport, LA the Rev. Canon Mary Goshert says: April 6, 2017 at 2:50 pm Parishes who left without regard to what could happen are as much to blame for the current situation as any faithful Episcopal official. I remember a Methodist Church that tried to pull out of their annual conference over civil rights issues. This Methodist Bishop closed the church and the annual conference sold it to the local county government for a parking lot. Decisions have consequences. April 2, 2017 at 1:34 am Well said, Mary. St. James should have the opportunity to thrive by rediscovering its identity and moving forward to new challenges in mission and ministry. Bishop Bruno is blocking the path. Susan Russell says: March 31, 2017 at 3:40 pm Having known Mary Goshert and her faithful ministry of many years in this Diocese, I fully respect her candid testimony on this unhappy situation. Will Gatlin says: March 31, 2017 at 4:19 pm Nice to see that you are still in the saddle, Father. Are you retired, or now nearing retirement? Rector Collierville, TN April 3, 2017 at 1:02 am Fred! Thank you! That note was so very difficult to write. +Jon is not a villain, even if he’s totally wrong in his actions. It would be so easy to see this whole sad contretemps as a clear cut good/evil situation, but that just isn’t so. I appreciate your comments. Are you and Billie still living in Concord” We should get together. Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska April 2, 2017 at 12:21 am Notice that few of the comments here even suggest that we are all supposed to be working toward reconciliation and against the judgemental spirits that got the church into the entire mess to begin with. The lack of willingness to seek reconciliation is itself evidence that needs to be taken into consideration by the hearing panel. The fact that a congregation is NOT a building is the opportunity for everyone to reconcile and move forward. If control of the building is the basis of your faith, contributions, and church membership, there are other denominational opportunities for you and then please leave the rest of us in peace. Why was the name “Episcopal Church” chosen? The Greek word episcopos means “bishop” or “overseer,” which is used because the Episcopal Church is governed by bishops. The mission of the Episcopal Church is to “restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ” (BCP, p. 855). Rector Pittsburgh, PA Donald Heacock says: Property Eric Bonetti says: Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 1, 2017 at 2:19 pm The Bruno Affair is a very good reason for me to NOT be an Episcopalian anymore, having left to start an Old Catholic mission in Palm Springs, CA. Episcopalians are WAY TOO MUCH consumed with money and power. The Bruno Affair was about both: + Bruno used the Courts to get his way, to establish his “power” and then tried to sell the property to reclaim what it cost to do that. ALL OF THAT is without any reference to the trust purpose of being church: to proclaim the Kingdom of God, by administering the seven sacraments, and living the Gospel. Being church is not about enhancing power relationships, feeding one’s Type A personality appetites, or making gobs of money. It is about spreading the love of Jesus, period. The bottom line here is simple: give the people of St. James their church and get rid of + Bruno. There is more than enough evidence to nail him. I hope the Hearing Panel has the courage to do that right thing. If I were in their shoes, I would offer + Bruno two alternatives: 1. Deed the church to the parish and accept a suspension through 12/31/18 or 2. Deposition from ministry. It is time to put down the mighty + Bruno from his seat and exalt the humble and meek people of St. James. I ask Our Lady to offer prayers to God for a just outcome. Thomas Vocca says: the Rev. Canon Mary Goshert says: Jane Riedel says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 31, 2017 at 8:35 pm Rev. Canon Mary Goshert- you say Bishop Bruno is hiding behind “shreds of legal details” – and yet the same legal tatters are being used to condemn him. Diminishing his legal defense belies the heart of the matter:To his detractors, it doesn’t matter whether the Bishop did everything by the book. I sense the people of St. James would feel equally hurt regardless of whether there are canonical grounds on which to formally discipline the Bishop.I appreciate your words and the wounding this closure has caused. I can’t imagine a home of worship could ever be closed painlessly. But I would ask: can we imagine a scenario where it’s in the best of interests of the larger Church to sell an individual place of worship? If the answer is a categorical “no,” well, then, that seems like we enter a separate conversation entirely. But if the answer is “yes,” then we must accept that being part of a faith community means people will bump heads about when and where to make that judgment call. It’s okay to think the Bishop made the wrong call, it’s okay to feel deep loss, and I think standing up for one’s place of worship is a noble goal. But I’m saddened that the path to that goal means raking someone across the coals for their well-intentioned judgment call. Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Karen Burr McKee says: Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH March 31, 2017 at 7:28 pm HeAR Ye Hear Ye. Lay or clerical. Never build an a congregation who’s building is owned by the Diocese. There are free churches that worship with the Episcopal Church. Study St Paul’s Key West, Florida & St.Mary The Virgin in NYC. THERE is no certainly as to what The Episcopal Church will choose to believe & force on you. It is certain they will do this without Anglican Communion concorde Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 31, 2017 The Rev. Fred Fenton says: May 1, 2017 at 6:14 pm Just another dissident Parish seeking to harm Our Bishop and TEC for the fact that when they left the Church,they left the building itself and the Treasury of the Parish in the hands of the Church. But the GAFCON folks and related Parishes still cannot seem to get it into their heads that if you leave the Church,these are the consequences. Throw all the stones you like but it will do you not one whit’s good., In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 1, 2017 at 11:07 am Grateful for this … dare I say it … fair and balanced reporting of this sad story. It’s exactly the link I needed to send to parish leaders to contextualize the events of this week in our Big Fat Diocesan Family as we all pray for resolution and reconciliation on the other side of this season of conflict and challenge. Press Release Service March 31, 2017 at 7:28 pm HeAR Ye Hear Ye. Lay or clerical. Never build an a congregation who’s building is owned by the Diocese. There are free churches that worship with the Episcopal Church. Study St Paul’s Key West, Florida & St.Mary The Virgin in NYC. THERE is no certainly as to what The Episcopal Church will choose to believe & force on you. It is certain they will do this without Anglican Communion concorde Rodney A. Reynolds says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Disciplinary hearing for Los Angeles’ Bruno concludes without decision Hearing Panel’s conclusion will not come until sometime after Easter Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rt. Rev. David McMannes says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 31, 2017 at 1:26 pm I was an elected member of Diocesan Council in the Diocese of Los Angeles for all the time that the Diocese was in legal negotiations to regain clear title to the church property that dissidents attempted to take when they left the Episcopal Church. I was also rector (successively) to two healthy congregations in the Diocese. I was in full and enthusiastic agreement with Bishop Bruno for leading those negotiations: he was correct that his fiduciary responsibility mandated that action. The experience of the Diocese with a previous dissident action in which the parish property was ceded to dissidents was no help to the diocese. At no time in all the many meetings of Diocesan Council was it ever said by Bishop Bruno or his staff that the end purpose of this bitter negotiation would be to sell the properties when they were recovered: the end purpose was always described as returning the properties to parish use. When the properties were returned, and All Saints, Long Beach asked to purchase the parish property there, that seemed reasonable: there are four Episcopal churches within about a 5 mile radius, and All Saints had not participated fully in the life of the Diocese for many years. The situation with St. James is diametrically different. St. James was a powerhouse parish in Orange County: it was a charismatic worship center (which I respected even though that worship style is not my preference.) It opened much of its property to community needs. It was a deep tragedy for the Episcopal Church when the rector led the parish out of the Church, after maneuvering for years to mute those who disagreed with him, and who then was assured by Howard Ahmanson,Jr., and others that he could indeed take the property with him and the remnant of the congregation who followed him out. Mr. Ahmanson’s wealth provided a very large proportion of the funds these dissidents used to argue their desires in court. When at last the property was returned to the Diocese, Bishop Bruno re-opened the church in a great celebration of faith and hope. He did NOT ‘deliver a little pep talk’ to the congregation and the diocese: he spoke in ringing prophecy and great energy about how the congregation could and would rise again, he referred to the Rev. Canon Cindy Voorhees as the priest and pastor whose skills would facilitate that new rise, and he promised diocesan support for that renewal. Those words are available to anyone who wants to see a video and listen to that service of renewal. The congregation — and many in the diocese — took Bishop Bruno at his very word. It has been utterly shocking to hear Bishop Bruno say that he never intended to renew congregations in any of the four properties: that he ever intended to sell the properties. It’s been demoralizing to have Bishop Bruno disclaim the actual words he spoke to St. James. And it’s been a tragedy to see this man whom I’ve known and deeply cared for and respected for forty years descend to clawing on to the shreds of legal details, throwing his faithful cleric Cindy Voorhees under the bus, and acting the bully profiteer. I hope and pray for diocesan reconciliation, and for the national Church to call Bishop Bruno to account and give St. James its opportunity to thrive. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (19) Bruno Hearing, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing April 2, 2017 at 12:26 am I am glad to see that the hierarchy is taking this whole matter seriously. Far too often, the church simply circles the wagons when there are allegations of misconduct. Or it claims that the “weighty and material” clause is Title IV requires rape, mayhem, and murder before the larger church will get involved. Yes, the canons recite that clergy are held to a higher standard, but the reality is that they far too often are held to a lower standard, or no standard at all.Prayers for truth and justice for all. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Val Hillsdon-Hutton says: Rector Washington, DC Lloyd Newell says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 31, 2017 at 7:27 pm What a bag of worms April 4, 2017 at 5:50 pm While I was still living in the wonderful Diocese of the Rio Grande, which I left because of family illness elsewhere, I had mentally applauded that some congregations were choosing to rent space rather than spend enormous amounts of money on mortgages and maintenance. If a church is indeed a congregation rather than a building, then a rented building can function perfectly well. It is amazing what a feeling of reverence can happen in a corporate “office park” type building with just the addition of a pulpit and the other instruments of the service. Historic buildings pose a different problem and one would hate to see them torn down. April 1, 2017 at 10:58 pm I do not like, nor do I respect Jon Bruno. In my very limited dealings with him I found him duplicitous and startlingly callous and petulant. I will continue to pray for him, but more often than not my words go up but my thoughts remain below. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Lisa Fox says: Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno spent nearly seven hours March 29 and 30 talking to the Hearing Panel considering the disciplinary action against him. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Pasadena, California] Three days of testimony in the ecclesiastical disciplinary hearing for Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno ended here March 30 without a resolution.Church Attorney Raymond “Jerry” Coughlan, appointed to represent the Episcopal Church, and Diocese of Los Angeles Chancellor Richard Zevnik did not make oral closing statements. They will submit written briefs for the Hearing Panel to consider before making its decision.“I have no idea how long our decision will take but there are other canonical processes involved that could mean this could go on for a while,” Diocese of Southern Virginia Bishop Herman Hollerith IV, president of the Hearing Panel, told spectators at the end of the session. “This is not going to be something that is going to happen before Easter.”The allegations detailed at the hearing stem from Bruno’s behavior during and after his unsuccessful 2015 attempt to sell St. James the Great Episcopal Church in Newport Beach to a condominium developer for $15 million. Members of the church initially filed the disciplinary complaint against him.Bruno is alleged to have violated Title IV Canon IV.4.1(g) by failing to exercise his ministry in accordance with applicable church canons (specifically Title II Canon II.6.3 requiring prior standing committee consent to any plan for a church or chapel to be “removed, taken down, or otherwise disposed of for worldly or common use”), Title IV Canon IV.4.1(h)(6) by engaging in “conduct involving dishonesty, deceit or misrepresentation” and Title IV Canon IV.4.1(h)(8) for “conduct unbecoming a member of the clergy.” The applicable subsections of Title IV Canon IV.4.1 begin on page 135 here.The St. James the Great complainants allege that Bruno violated church canons because he:failed to get the consent of the diocesan standing committee before entering into a contract to sell the property;misrepresented his intention for the property to the members, the clergy and the local community at large;misrepresented that St. James the Great was not a sustainable congregation;misrepresented that the Rev. Canon Cindy Evans Voorhees, St. James’ vicar, had resigned;misrepresented to some St. James members that he would lease the property back to them for a number of months and that the diocese would financially aid the church; andengaged in conduct unbecoming a member of the clergy by “misleading and deceiving” the clergy and people of St. James, as well as the local community, about his plans for the property and for taking possession of the property and locking out the congregation.The Rev. Canon Kelli-Grace Kurtz, convening chair of Los Angeles’ program group on missions, discusses with the Hearing Panel what the diocese requires of those congregations. She said the group classified St. James as a “mission station” and thus it had to comply with certain reporting requirements. The Rev. Canon Cindy Evans Voorhees, St. James’ vicar, had testified that she reported verbally to Bruno and did not think she needed to submit those reports. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceBruno said in his response brief to the Hearing Panel that five of the allegations must be decided in his favor because “undisputed evidence establishes no canonical violation.” He said the sixth allegation concerning alleged misrepresentations to Voorhees presents conflicting evidence for the panel to weigh. However, he called it a “she said (he told me he wouldn’t sell the property), he said (I never said I wouldn’t sell the property) dichotomy.”The Hearing Panel has a number of actions it can take, ranging from dismissal of the allegations to removing Bruno from his ordained ministry. Bruno or Coughlan would have 40 days to appeal the Hearing Panel’s decision to the Court of Review for Bishops.March 30 began with Bruno spending nearly two hours answering questions from Coughlan and Zevnik about his March 28 testimony. The questions ranged over a number of topics aimed at understanding the bishop’s actions surrounding his attempt to sell St. James the Great, and his motivations for those actions. High on the list of motivations was providing money to fund the ongoing mission and ministry of the diocese.Money was an issue, Bruno and other witnesses said because the diocese had spent more than $10 million on the lengthy litigation that eventually returned four properties to the diocese that had been held by disaffiliated Episcopalians. Bruno said the expense was worth it to set a precedent about church property ownership in the diocese and in the state. He went forward with the actions even after then-Presiding Bishop Frank Griswold and the presiding bishop’s chancellor, David Booth Beers, advised against it, he said.Bruno and others discussed evidence showing that the sale of St. James was also one possible way for the diocese to have the money to buy the remaining interest in some commercial properties in Anaheim, California. Donors had bequeathed to the diocese a partial interest in those properties. The properties produce income for the diocese and the diocese also thought it might be able to sell the property near Angel Stadium. One document showed that the properties appraised at $140 million. The diocese has since borrowed the money to acquire a 100 percent interest in the properties.Some of the other March 30 witnesses said Bruno also wanted to leave the diocese in good financial health when he retires. Bruno turns 72, the Episcopal Church’s mandatory retirement age for clergy, in late 2018. His successor, Bishop Coadjutor-Elect John Taylor, is due to be ordained and consecrated on July 8 of this year.Diocesan Chief of Staff David Tumilty tells the Hearing Panel about Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno’s concerns over the financial health of the diocese and how those concerns informed his decisions about St. James. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThey said the diocese had been hard-hit not only by the litigation costs but also by the 2008 recession that came as the diocese was spending capital to pay for the litigation, according to diocesan Chief of Staff David Tumilty.Tumilty said that spending resulted in staff cuts and cuts to programs such as one that provided counseling for priests. He also explained that the California “corporation sole” through which Bruno controlled some but not all of diocesan property and other assets was getting strapped by having frequently to cover operating deficits in what is known as the Mission Share Fund budget.The need for recovering capital was a theme in the March 30 testimony. For instance, when Coughlan asked the bishop who now was liaison to the Anglican Communion Compass Rose Society, an $110,000 job that he had offered to Voorhees, Bruno said the job was unfilled. “I don’t have the money to have it now because I am paying for two years of litigation,” he said, referring to the Title IV proceedings.“Whose fault is that?” a few members of the audience asked softly but clearly. Voorhees turned and hushed the audience and later Hollerith reminded spectators of his requirement that they not speak out.Testimony March 30 also showed that the sale of St. James the Great caused controversy between at least two diocesan leaders. The Rev. Canon Melissa McCarthy, Standing Committee president during 2015 and 2016, told the panel that then-Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool called her to inquire about a possible sale of St. James. McCarthy said Glasspool told her that, as standing committee president, McCarthy had a duty to block the sale. She said Glasspool asked her to contact an Episcopal diocesan chancellor in the state whom MCarthy knew and whom Glasspool thought could help develop an argument against the sale.The Rev. Canon Melissa McCarthy, who chaired the Diocese of Los Angeles’ Standing Committee during 2015 and 2016, tells the Hearing Panel about the committee’s actions surrounding Bruno’s attempted sale of the St. James the Great Episcopal Church property. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceGlasspool planned to contact other Episcopal bishops about the sale, McCarthy said. After praying for a day, McCarthy said she contacted Bruno to tell him about the conversation because she found out that the bishop had confidentially disclosed the offer to buy St. James during a meeting of diocesan executive leadership.“The bishop suffragan had called the president of the standing committee and enlisted her support to undermine what the bishop diocesan was doing,” McCarthy said, explaining her reason for calling Bruno. “And [because she] had broken his confidentiality, I felt like he needed to know.”The standing committee approved Bruno’s effort to sell St. James during a special June 8, 2015, meeting more than two months after Bruno accepted the offer. The members gave their approval, she said, even though Bruno did not ask for it. Because the title to the property resided in the corporation sole, McCarthy said, Bruno believed he could act without their approval. McCarthy noted that her committee eventually would have to approve deconsecrating the church if the sale went through.“We want to have some way to clearly show our support,” she said. “Unique circumstances” surrounded that decision because, by June 8, McCarthy said, “there had already been a social-media campaign launched” and other opposition to the sale had formed.Moreover, McCarthy said, the committee knew the bishop was looking for ways to recoup the litigation costs and he was concerned about the financial shape of the diocese when he retired. Committee members also talked about how “a congregation and a building are two different things” and that the sale of the property was “in line with the plan that the bishop had had for a number of years.”When Bruno formed the intention to sell St. James and whether and when he disclosed that intention to Voorhees and the members of St. James has been in dispute. Voorhees and others have insisted that they believed Bruno wanted them to revive St. James so that it could continue in the hard-won building.The Title IV disciplinary process based on professional-conduct modelAlthough the Episcopal Church Title IV disciplinary canons in 2011 moved clergy disciplinary actions from a legalistic process to a professional-conduct model, many legal terms persist. For instance, Hollerith and the attorneys referred questioning as “cross-examination” and there were “objections” about some questions or whether certain “evidence” was “admissible.”Clare Zabala-Bangao, Diocese of Los Angeles coordinator for mission congregations, tells the Hearing Panel about her efforts to have St. James’ lay leaders and the Rev. Canon Cindy Evans Voorhees, the vicar, file required monthly financial reports. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceHowever, the ultimate goal, according Title IV’s introduction (page 131 here), is that “the Church and each Diocese shall support their members in their life in Christ and seek to resolve conflicts by promoting healing, repentance, forgiveness, restitution, justice, amendment of life and reconciliation among all involved or affected.”Each day’s session began and ended with prayer led by Hearing Panel member the Rev. Erik Larsen of Rhode Island. The opening prayer concluded with all participants and onlookers saying the Lord’s Prayer aloud in unison. At the end of the March 30 afternoon session, Larsen prayed that God would guide the panel to “discern the truth and find your will for us as we move forward.” Larsen prayed that as that discernment continued and people waited on the outcome that “above all we would not lose the charity that you reveal in your son Jesus.”Hollerith concluded the session with a blessing and liturgical dismissal.In addition to Hollerith and Larsen, the members of the Hearing Panel considering the allegations against Bruno include Rhode Island Bishop Nicholas Knisely, North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith, and Deborah Stokes of Southern Ohio. All are members of the Disciplinary Board for Bishops, which appointed them.The Hearing Panel met at the Courtyard by Marriott Hotel in Pasadena, about 90 minutes northeast of Newport Beach. Save St. James the Great organized buses to travel to and from the hearing each day. Close to 120 people at times sat in the gallery during the daily sessions.Previous ENS coverage of the hearing is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is senior editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rev. David Justin Lynch says: Rector Belleville, IL April 1, 2017 at 12:28 pm Thank you, Mary Francis, for a superb and balanced report of this complicated issue. As a newcomer to this diocese, I have found it difficult to understand the proceedings over the last couple of years. Your clear reporting has helped a lot!!last_img read more