Syracuse begins 10-game field hockey schedule against Duke on Sept. 18

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ The Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Syracuse field hockey will play a shortened 10-game schedule this fall that includes six conference games, the Atlantic Coast Conference announced Friday. The Orange open their season Sept. 18 with a home game against Duke, though the game won’t count as one of the six conference games. SU’s first conference game that counts toward the standings, also against Duke, comes two days later.Syracuse, which finished fifth out of seven ACC teams last season with a 3-3 conference record, is set to play doubleheaders against Duke, Virginia, Boston College and Wake Forest in addition to one game against North Carolina and Louisville. For the four teams the Orange are playing twice, only one game will apply for the ACC’s standings.SU has home games against Duke, Boston College and Louisville. The team will travel to North Carolina, the defending national champions, as well as Virginia and Wake Forest.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe ACC Championship — scheduled to take place at Duke’s Jack Katz Stadium on Nov. 5, 6 and 8 — will be a single-elimination tournament featuring all seven of the conference’s teams. Syracuse lost 1-0 to Louisville in the first round of the ACC Championship last season. Although the Orange made the NCAA tournament, they were also eliminated in the first round after a 5-1 loss to Princeton.  Published on September 4, 2020 at 1:06 pm Contact Roshan: [email protected] | @Roshan_f16center_img Commentslast_img read more

Video: Warriors coach Steve Kerr on Jacob Evans’ return, Kevon Looney’s value

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or videos on a mobile deviceAhead of the Warriors playing the Memphis Grizzlies Monday night, coach Steve Kerr said it’s not easy for Golden State guard Jacob Evans, who has missed 21 games with an adductor strain in his left hip, to vie for minutes as he returns to the team.Evans’ return gives the Warriors will have 12 available players for the first time since the opening week of the season. Evans accompanied the team during it’s …last_img

Bringing African children’s stories to a new generation

first_imgWhat do you do if the bookstore doesn’t have books in your language, or they’re just too expensive? Sadly, this is often the case in Africa, a continent that is home to more than 2 000 languages.On a continent with over 2000 languages, finding mother tongue children’s books is a challenge. (Image: African Storybook)Brand South Africa reporterHolidays are a great occasion for reading, whether children are reading quietly to themselves or are sitting with their families with a book. But what do you do if the bookstore doesn’t have books in your language, or they’re just too expensive? Sadly, this is often the case in Africa, a continent that is home to more than 2 000 languages.To read “Maguru gives out legs” click the link below. https://t.co/0rHOmi5oZm Illustration by Wiehan de Jager pic.twitter.com/XzhGuoeo0U— AfricanStorybook.org (@africastorybook) December 7, 2015The African Storybook project may hold some solutions for families who want to read African stories with their children. It started in Kenya, Uganda, South Africa and Lesotho, and has spread to Niger, Ghana, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Mozambique.In this time, it has collected more than 2 300 stories in 62 African languages. They are all free for download or printing, with some highlighted stories available in video format on the project’s YouTube channel. All the tales offer fascinating insights into how people on the continent tell stories that explore sometimes tough themes and ideas.Read more on “Adun, the beautiful” https://t.co/EXhqTopVL6 Story also available in #Yoruba https://t.co/Im8Was823R pic.twitter.com/g5kFjOGivk— AfricanStorybook.org (@africastorybook) November 2, 2015“Children’s books can tackle big themes in the simplest ways,” says African Storybook artist Catherine Groenewald. The stories deal with real issues faced by children in Africa today in a compassionate, realistic yet humorous manner. Death, urbanisation, respect for elders, and many more moral lessons are taught using the story format, accompanied by vibrant art.Here are some stories from the project’s website that children of all ages can enjoy during the long school holiday and once they’re back in class:Tselane and the giantAfter Tselane’s father dies her mother wants them to move to another village to start a new life. But Tselane does not want to go; her mother agrees to let her stay on her own. They make a pact that Tselane must only open the door when she hears her mother sing. But a giant is listening to their conversation and plans to catch Tselane.Nozibele, Meriri and MeraroThree young girls go to the forest to gather some wood on a hot day. There is enough, they think, and they can swim until it gets cooler. But by the time they finish swimming, it is already late and they have to rush back home.KhayangaKhayanga, a 10-year-old-girl, is taken in by a distant, poor and frail relative after the death of her parents. Her loss and pain lead her to seek guidance and comfort from her parents’ graves.Other stories include Leaving One Home for Another, about spending the holidays with grandmother in the countryside. Exploring the effects of a rapidly urbanised Africa, this is a familiar theme for many. And the story’s moral of strong family ties and teaching respect for elders is a universal one, ringing true in any culture and language.The African Storybook series also features more traditional African stories that often convey a moral lesson or caution against greed and other vices, such as the Ghanaian story Anansi and Turtle. In this story, Anansi the spider greedily eats all the food before his dinner guest Turtle gets a chance. But what can Anansi do when Turtle invites him over to her place for dinner – under water?Other stories are far more serious, such as Tingi and the Cows. Based on real events, the story is about soldiers entering a village as seen from the perspective of a young herd boy. It is an excellent starting point for a conversation about fear and brutality that has affected people across the continent, including many children. It’s a reminder that not all children are lucky enough to fully enjoy the holidays.This week’s #StorybookFriday is of Lekishon and his cows, an #earlyreading story about a Maasai boy. #Literature pic.twitter.com/5WDoJygAxH— AfricanStorybook.org (@africastorybook) August 14, 2015While teaching important life lessons, children also get a chance to develop their love of reading and language. Sometimes the tone of the books is also a little more nonsensical, funny and interactive. In Mr Fly and Mr Bighead, two whimsical characters want to cross a river. But Mr Bighead’s head is so big that he sinks. Mr Fly, on the other hand, “laughed so much that his mouth tore in two from one side to the other”.Naughty Hare is up to his tricks again. What will Elephant do to become a fast runner? pic.twitter.com/5ElqcDSGKs— AfricanStorybook.org (@africastorybook) September 14, 2015Going globalThe African Storybook caters, as the name indicates, to African languages. But sharing traditional and contemporary African stories is also important, not least for children from elsewhere to partake in the rich oral tradition and experience a positive picture of the continent.The creation of the Global African Storybook Project has made this possible. Stories have been translated into Cantonese, German, Hindi, Jamaican Creole, Norwegian and many more – 16 languages in total, and growing.This gives children from all over the world the chance to read stories from and about Africa.Telling your own storiesThe best stories are the ones you make up yourself. This is not only possible with the African Storybook, it is encouraged. Many of the stories on the website are adaptations of stories that others have written. The picture database has thousands of pictures that can be used to make a new story, or added to an existing story.Stories can serve many purposes, and with the African Storybook and Global African Storybook Project, African children’s stories are more accessible than ever before, in African and non-African languages alike.There are over 100 stories to read from on the #AfricanStorybook website. http://t.co/5x57CXN02y pic.twitter.com/waQPpfta8b— AfricanStorybook.org (@africastorybook) April 16, 2015Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

“Diary of a Wimpy Kid” Author Talks Geocaching

first_imgGeocaching partnered with Diary of a Wimpy Kid author Jeff Kinney to create a fun set of Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul trackable tags to celebrate the book’s release last year. What you may not know is that the Wimpy Kid trackables came about because Jeff Kinney is a geocacher. He enjoys taking his kids out on geocaching adventures. We are thrilled that he wanted to share one of his geocaching experiences with us.If you are following his series, you will be excited to learn that the next book, Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Old School, will be released on November 3, 2015. This book is particularly exciting because it will go on sale on the same day in 90 countries around the world, which has never been done by any book before!Kinney shared one of his geocaching experiences with us, in his own words.Geocacher and author, Jeff Kinney poses with Greg Heffley from his Diary of a Wimpy Kid series.By Jeff KinneyWhen I first learned about geocaching a few years back, I was thoroughly confused. People have stored little treasures in hiding places all around me? It seemed like an odd pastime to me. But mysterious and exciting at the same time.I was looking for something fun (and cheap) to do with my two sons. And so I downloaded the Geocaching app. I was ready to head off into the wilderness some miles away, armed with a walking stick and an iPhone, braving ticks and scrambling over felled trees. But as a swarm of blue dots filled the map on my screen, I was surprised (alarmed?) to find that there was a hidden treasure not 200 yards from the back of my house.Now this was exciting. I made sure my kids had adequate footwear and we headed out, stepping from the verdant grass of our backyard into actual raw nature. There was some scrambling and some hopping over creeks formed by snow melt runoff. There was some negotiating of brambles. There may have even been some burs. I’ll admit, I’m not exactly the outdoor type, so the thrill of forging my way through the wild… with two of my progeny in tow… had the feeling of real danger.Eventually, we reached a clearing where power lines cut through the woods (OK, so maybe it wasn’t raw nature). By now, we were getting close. The pulsing blue dot was nearby, but where could the hiding spot be? These were early days of GPS pinpointing, and the dot hopped madly around the screen. It seemed that our quarry was on the move, taunting us.I was waiting for the dot to stop. Then we’d creep up on it, look down, and find the treasure at our feet.My kids must’ve detected the confusion on my face. This was a strange ordeal for them to begin with, so the sight of me spinning in place and shaking my iPhone violently didn’t give them a feeling of confidence.But then I realized I needed to start thinking like the first person who had decided that this was the place to hide a cache. I gave up on the teleporting dot on my phone and started using my eyes.My eyes fell to a fallen tree. It was all starting to come together. But where was the cache? Under the tree? Oh no! Did someone place a cache in this spot and a tree fell on it? This was going to be very hard to explain to my sons.By then, my eldest son had climbed over the tree to investigate it from a different angle. And that’s when he found it. A plastic box, hidden in a hole in the log.A real eureka moment. Inside the box was a giant pencil. A decent treasure for the effort put in. We added our names to the log, proud members of a long list of explorers who had come to the same spot, but from different starting places.Neither of my kids saw me palm a baseball I had brought from home and slip it into the box before putting it back in the fallen tree. I didn’t need the tears.A good bite-sized adventure and one I’ve repeated in locales further from home.I never did teach them how to throw a baseball.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedDiary of a Wimpy Kid Trackables on the Move!August 1, 2014In “Community”Inside Geocaching HQ Podcast Transcript (Episode 11): The Magic of trackable promotionsMay 10, 2018Similar postFeatured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

Report Suggests LimeWire’s Closure Means Less Music Piracy, But Is That Really True?

first_imgIt’s an argument that the music industry likes to make: go after P2P file-sharing sites, sue them, shut them down, and as a result we’ll have less music piracy. But is that really the case?According to a study released today by the market research company NPD Group, a market research group, it is. The company contends that since a federal judge ordered that the peer-to-peer site Limewire shut its doors in the fall of last year, that the peer-to-peer filesharing of music – both the number of files downloaded and the number of users of the P2P sites – has declined.The NPD reports that the percentage of Internet users in the U.S. that are using P2P services for music has fallen from a high of 16% in the fourth quarter of 2007 to just 9% in the fourth quarter of 2010. The average number of files downloaded declined from 35 tracks per person to 18 tracks per person over the same time period. There are now roughly 16 million P2P users downloading music, 12 million fewer than in 2007.“LimeWire was so popular for music file trading, and for so long, that its closure has had a powerful and immediate effect on the number of people downloading music files from peer-to-peer services and curtailed the amount being swapped,” says Russ Crupnick, NPD’s entertainment industry analyst. While the NPD statistics make the actions against LimeWire seem like a win for the music industry, but it’s worth scrutinizing the argument closely. LimeWire was used by about 56% of those using P2P services, NPD reports, but that doesn’t mean that those users simply stopped file-sharing. After all, while Limewire was shuttered, other P2P sites reported an increased usage. Furthermore, over that same time period studied in the report – from 2007 to 2010 – a number of new options have become available for Internet users to get their music. Streaming and subscription services like Spotify and Pandora have changed the way that music is consumed online.The NPD study was gathered from self-reported data, which also makes its findings a little difficult to say much about. But no matter the origin of the data here, it’s a bit of a stretch to contend that LimeWire’s closure means less piracy. Less file-sharing? Maybe. Less piracy? I’m not sure. Regardless of the accuracy, it’s likely we’ll see these statistics invoked by those that argue that going after P2P websites is a good move for the music industry. Tags:#p2p#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts audrey watterslast_img read more