Kristin Chenoweth Performs At StarStudded Human Rights Hero Awards

first_imgTHE HUMAN RIGHTS HERO AWARDS held last week at Beso restaurant brought out some of the biggest names in Hollywood to award individuals for their tireless work to bring awareness to the issues of human trafficking.The annual event produced by actress Marisol Nichols (“24,” “NCIS”) and her nonprofit organization, Foundation for a Slavery Free World in partnership with Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI), awarded Board Member and CEO of the National Center For Missing and Exploited Children John Ryan for his 15 years of service; Founder and Executive Director of Saving Innocence Kim Biddle; as well as Nancy Rivard, President and Founder of Airline Ambassadors.Emmy and Tony award-winner Kristin Chenoweth performed alongside award-winning composer David Campbell. Special keynote speakers included former CIA/Homeland Security Operative and CEO of Operation Underground Railroad Tim Ballard, and Utah’s Attorney General Sean Reyes.Terry Crews (“Brooklyn Nine-Nine”), Kelly Preston, Jenna Elfman, and Erika Christensen (“Parenthood”) were several of the presenters on-hand to honor the human rights heroes. Other attendees included: Danny Masterson, Leslie David Baker (“The Office”), Carlson Young (“Scream”), Jennifer Aspen (“GCB”), Daphne Wayans (“In Living Color”), Amrapali Ambegaokar (“Scandal”), Marlon Yates (STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON), Joanna Going (“Kingdom”), EG Daily (PEE WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE), Azie Tesfai (“Jane The Virgin”), Charlotte Ross (“Arrow”), Becca Tobin (“Glee”), McKaley Miller (“Hart of Dixie”), Kerri Kasem (Radio personality), Nicky Whelan (THE WEDDING RINGER), Catherine Oxenberg (“Dynasty”), Emma Booth (“Glitch”), Izabella Miko (STEP UP ALL IN), Keith Robinson (GET ON UP), and Nicholas Gonzalez (THE PURGE: ANARCHY).YHRI is a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, an educator born and raised in apartheid South Africa, where she witnessed first-hand the devastating effects of discrimination and the lack of basic human rights. The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace.last_img read more

Researchers discover a way to tease oxygen molecules from carbon dioxide

first_img New work from UC Davis shows that carbon dioxide can be split by vacuum ultraviolet laser to create oxygen in one step. The discovery may change how we think about the evolution of atmospheres. Credit: Zhou Lu, UC Davis NASA research gives guideline for future alien life search More information: Evidence for direct molecular oxygen production in CO2 photodissociation, Science 3 October 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6205 pp. 61-64 . DOI: 10.1126/science.1257156 ABSTRACTPhotodissociation of carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been assumed to proceed exclusively to carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen atom (O) primary products. However, recent theoretical calculations suggested that an exit channel to produce C + O2 should also be energetically accessible. Here we report the direct experimental evidence for the C + O2 channel in CO2 photodissociation near the energetic threshold of the C(3P) + O2(X3Σg–) channel with a yield of 5 ± 2% using vacuum ultraviolet laser pump-probe spectroscopy and velocity-map imaging detection of the C(3PJ) product between 101.5 and 107.2 nanometers. Our results may have implications for nonbiological oxygen production in CO2-heavy atmospheres.Press release (Phys.org) —A small team of researchers with the University of California has found a way break apart carbon dioxide molecules and get carbon atoms and oxygen molecules instead of carbon monoxide and an oxygen atom. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they did it, and the implications of their findings. Arthur Suits and David Parker offer a perspective piece in the same journal issue that describes in more depth, minimum energy path (MEP) where reactants don’t always follow the easiest path during chemical reactions and how it pertains to the work done by this group. Ball-and-stick model of carbon dioxide. Credit: Wikipedia Explore further Over the years, scientists have developed a theory about the development of life on planet Earth that’s known as the “Great Oxidation Event,” where plants developed and began taking in carbon dioxide and pumping out oxygen. In this new effort, the researchers believe they have found a way to achieve the same feat using a non-biological approach. They’ve used the shortest wavelength of ultraviolet light, aka, vacuum ultraviolet light (VUV) to break apart carbon dioxide molecules.The VUV was provided in the form of a laser shooting a beam at carbon dioxide molecules to break them apart. Another laser was used to ionize the pieces from the broken molecule so that they could be measured by a mass spectrometer. The process resulted in just 5 percent of the carbon dioxide molecules splitting into oxygen molecules and carbon atoms (the rest went to carbon monoxide and oxygen atoms) but that was more than enough to show that the process can be used to get molecular oxygen from carbon dioxide—and that might have a far reaching impact.center_img Citation: Researchers discover a way to tease oxygen molecules from carbon dioxide (2014, October 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-oxygen-molecules-carbon-dioxide.html Journal information: Science © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The process works, the team explains because of MEP reactions and because of that, it seems reasonable to conclude that some oxygen in early Earth’s atmosphere came about the same way—with all the oxygen in the atmosphere today, VUV doesn’t penetrate very far but when the atmosphere had far more carbon dioxide in it, it follows that some of those molecules could have split into carbon atoms and oxygen molecules. That also means that the same process could occur on other planets, which means scientists looking for life on other planets would have to look for a lot more than just oxygen in their atmospheres.Another possible impact of the findings by the team involves space exploration—if an apparatus could be built that could continually knock oxygen molecules out of the carbon dioxide breathed out by astronauts, they wouldn’t have to carry oxygen tanks or use plants to do the conversion, making the whole process much more efficient.last_img read more

Students of 4 RKM Schools in top 10

first_imgKolkata: The students of four Ramakrishna Mission Schools have ranked within 10 of the merit list of the HS examination results of which were announced on Monday. Five students from Narendrapur Ramakrishna Mission have ranked between 5 and 9 in the merit list. Seventy students have scored more than 90 percent, 75 have got above 85 percent and 76 students have got above 75 percent. Four students of Ramakrishna Mission Boys’ Home High School, Rahara, have ranked between 5 and 9 in the merit list. Out of 129 students who appeared from this school, 57 got more than 90 percent marks. 100 students have got above 80 percent while another 107 scored more than 75 percent. Aritra Mondol, an orphan student, has scored 472/500 in Arts. Out of the 32 tribal students in Ramakrishna Mission Vidyamandira, Jhargram, 18 have got more than 75 percent marks. Two from Midnapore Ramakrishna Mission came 9 and 10 in the merit list while one from Malda claimed theighth position in the merit list.last_img read more